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Google is Adding Anti-Tampering DRM To Android Apps in the Play Store - 24 Jun 2018 at 4:01pm - Google has introduced a small change to Play Store apps that could significantly protect several Android users. From a report: Earlier this week, Google quietly rolled out a feature that adds a string of metadata to all APK files (that's the file type for Android apps) when they are signed by the developer. You can't install an application that hasn't been signed during its final build, so that means that all apps built using the latest APK Signature Scheme will have a nice little chunk of DRM built into them. And eventually, your phone will run a version of Android that won't be able to install apps without it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



VW electric racer smashes Pikes Peak's overall record - 24 Jun 2018 at 3:31pm - VW may have been overly cautious when it hoped to beat Pikes Peak's electric vehicle record with its purpose-built racer. Official lap time data has confirmed that Romain Dumas' I.D. R Pikes Peak made it up the legendary hill in just over 7 minutes...

DC Comics Returns To Supermarket Shelves With New, Giant-Sized Comics - 24 Jun 2018 at 3:00pm - DC Comics announced earlier this week that it has partnered with Walmart to revive its DC Giant range as a 100-page anthology format comic book. Four new series revolving around Batman, Superman, the Justice League, and the Teen Titans will launch solely in the retail stores starting July 1. From a report: Starting next month, each of the new monthly series will collect stories from the past two decades of DC Comics publishing -- including stories released as recently as this year -- revolving around each book's titular characters, as well as a few side stories featuring guest characters like Harley Quinn, the Terrifics, or even the recently introduced Sideways from the Dark Matter publishing initiative. But on top of that, each series will also include new ongoing stories from top DC creatives like Tom King, Andy Kubert, and the recently-arrived Brian Michael Bendis -- setting the Giant line apart from Marvel and Archie's digest series, which exclusively feature reprinted stories.

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Tesla will charge for 'premium' internet on new cars starting July 1st - 24 Jun 2018 at 2:01pm - Ever since Tesla started offering cellular data access in its cars, there's been the implication that it would eventually charge for service. In 2014, it indicated that would start charging in 2018. Four years later, that moment is at hand... altho...

Warner Bros Is Cracking Down On Harry Potter Festivals - 24 Jun 2018 at 2:00pm - Warner Bros is cracking down on local Harry Potter fan festivals around the country, saying it's necessary to halt unauthorized commercial activity. From a report: Fans, however, liken the move to Dementors sucking the joy out of homegrown fun, while festival directors say they'll transfigure the events into generic celebrations of magic. "It's almost as if Warner Bros. has been taken over by Voldemort, trying to use dark magic to destroy the light of a little town," said Sarah Jo Tucker, a 21-year-old junior at Chestnut Hill College, which hosts a Quidditch tournament that coincides with the annual suburban Philadelphia festival. Philip Dawson, Chestnut Hill's business district director, said Warner Bros. reached out to his group in May, letting them know new guidelines prohibit festivals' use of any names, places or objects from the series. That ruled out everything from meet-and-greet with Dumbledore and Harry to Defense Against the Dark Arts classes. Related story, from 18 years ago: Harry Potter Sites vs. Warner Brothers.

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The Rise of the Video-Game Gambler - 24 Jun 2018 at 1:01pm - Among the more insidious gifts that video games have bestowed on modern culture is the loot box. The New Yorker: A loot box is like an in-game lottery ticket: for a small fee, involving real money, a player can purchase an assortment of items that promise to enhance the game experience. Loot boxes are an appealing source of income for game developers, and they've been integral to the rise of smartphone "freemium" games, which are free to download but can't be fully enjoyed unless the player pays for in-app boosts. For pretty much everyone else, loot boxes are a scourge. Players hate that they have to pay extra just to be competitive. Parents hate discovering, too late, that several hundred dollars in Clash Royale arena packs have been charged to their credit card. And, increasingly, government regulators are thinking that loot boxes look too much like gambling -- gambling aimed at kids, no less. Belgium and the Netherlands have banned in-game loot boxes as a form of gambling, and Minnesota recently introduced a bill that would ban the sale of games containing loot boxes to people under the age of eighteen. The concern isn't merely prudish. In a finding that will surprise virtually no one, psychologists in New Zealand have discovered that loot boxes do indeed bear troubling similarities to gambling. The researchers, led by Aaron Drummond, of Massey University, looked at twenty-two console games released between 2016 and 2017, from Overwatch and FIFA 18 to Madden N.F.L. 18 and Star Wars Battlefront II. They noted how closely the loot-box system of each game aligned with five standard psychological criteria for gambling, including whether the loot box must be bought with real money, whether it has tangible value in the game or can be cashed out, and whether its contents are randomly determined.

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What's the best blender for smoothies? - 24 Jun 2018 at 12:30pm - By Lesley Stockton This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read the full article here. A thick and vel...

'Snapdragon 1000' Chip May Be Designed For PCs From the Ground Up - 24 Jun 2018 at 12:00pm - Qualcomm's Snapdragon 850 processor may be intended for PCs, but it's still a half step -- it's really a higher-clocked version of the same processor you'd find in your phone. The company may be more adventurous the next time, though. From a report: WinFuture says it has obtained details surrounding SDM1000 (possibly Snapdragon 1000), a previously hinted-at CPU that would be designed from the start for PCs. It would have a relatively huge design compared to most ARM designs (20mm x 15mm) and would consume a laptop-like 12W of power across the entire system-on-a-chip. It would compete directly with Intel's low-power Core processors where the existing 835 isn't really in the ballpark. A reference design found in import databases might give a clue as to what you could expect: it'd have up to 16GB of RAM and two 128GB storage modules.

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Some Science Journals That Claim To Peer Review Papers Do Not Do So - 24 Jun 2018 at 11:00am - A rising number of journals that claim to review submissions do not bother to do so. Not coincidentally, this seems to be leading some academics to inflate their publication lists with papers that might not pass such scrutiny. The Economist: Experts debate how many journals falsely claim to engage in peer review. Cabells, an analytics firm in Texas, has compiled a blacklist of those which it believes are guilty. According to Kathleen Berryman, who is in charge of this list, the firm employs 65 criteria to determine whether a journal should go on it -- though she is reluctant to go into details. Cabells' list now totals around 8,700 journals, up from a bit over 4,000 a year ago. Another list, which grew to around 12,000 journals, was compiled until recently by Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado. Using Mr Beall's list, Bo-Christer Bjork, an information scientist at the Hanken School of Economics, in Helsinki, estimates that the number of articles published in questionable journals has ballooned from about 53,000 a year in 2010 to more than 400,000 today. He estimates that 6% of academic papers by researchers in America appear in such journals.

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DNA synthesis breakthrough could lead to faster medical discoveries - 24 Jun 2018 at 10:50am - For all of the advancements in genetic research, DNA synthesis hasn't changed much in over four decades. That could make it a serious obstacle to scientists who are otherwise racing to develop a new drug or understand the human body. It might final...

8 Months After a Surge of Complaints, Apple Announces a Repair Program For It... - 24 Jun 2018 at 10:00am - Casey Johnston, writing for The Outline: At long last, Apple admitted to its customers that its MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboard designs are so flawed and prone to sticking or dead keys, as originally reported by The Outline in October, and that it will cover the cost of repairs beyond the products' normal warranty. The admission comes after the company has been hit with no fewer than three class action lawsuits concerning the computers and their ultra-thin butterfly-switch keyboards. While the repair and replacement program covers costs and notes that Apple will repair both single keys as well as whole keyboards when necessary, it doesn't note whether the replacements will be a different, improved design that will prevent the problem from happening again (and again, and again).

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Ben Heck's Alexa clock crane - 24 Jun 2018 at 8:30am - While the element14 Community is running a design challenge to help those with mental and physical impairments (which you can join in on), Sean and Connor Miller work with Ben, Felix and Karen to help a family member with multiple sclerosis. Watc...

eBay and Amazon Delist Faulty Carbon Monoxide Alarms - 24 Jun 2018 at 7:34am - An anonymous reader quotes the Guardian: Dozens of potentially deadly carbon monoxide alarms have been removed from sale by Amazon and eBay after a Which? investigation found some of them would not have protected their buyers. The consumer group tested four alarms that were on sale on both sites -- including an Amazon bestseller -- and found that they consistently failed to sound when the gas was present.... It said one of the alarms -- the Topolek GEHS007AW CO alarm (£14.99) -- was listed as a bestseller on Amazon. It failed to detect the gas in more than 80% of tests. Three other unbranded alarms that were made in China and sold through sellers on Amazon and eBay for under £10 also repeatedly failed to sound when there was carbon monoxide present... Which? said all four claimed to meet the British safety standard for detecting carbon monoxide. Both Amazon and eBay have now removed the alarms -- as well as "another 50 lookalike alarms."

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Google adds anti-tampering DRM to Android apps in the Play Store - 24 Jun 2018 at 4:08am - Google has made a small change to Play Store apps that could prove a significant help to the security of your Android phone. The company is now adding a "small amount" of security metadata to Android APKs to be sure that they were distributed throug...

NYT: 'Firefox Is Back. It's Time to Give It a Try.' - 24 Jun 2018 at 3:34am - Another high-profile endorsement for Firefox -- this time from the lead consumer technology writer for The New York Times. (Alternate link here). The web has reached a new low. It has become an annoying, often toxic and occasionally unsafe place to hang out. More important, it has become an unfair trade: You give up your privacy online, and what you get in return are somewhat convenient services and hyper-targeted ads. That's why it may be time to try a different browser. Remember Firefox...? About two years ago, six Mozilla employees were huddled around a bonfire one night in Santa Cruz, Calif., when they began discussing the state of web browsers. Eventually, they concluded there was a "crisis of confidence" in the web. "If they don't trust the web, they won't use the web," Mark Mayo, Mozilla's chief product officer, said in an interview.... After testing Firefox for the last three months, I found it to be on a par with Chrome in most categories. In the end, Firefox's thoughtful privacy features persuaded me to make the switch and make it my primary browser. The Times cites privacy features like Firefox's "Facebook Container," which prevents Facebook from tracking you after you've left their site. While both Chrome and Firefox have tough security (including sandboxing), Cooper Quintin, a security researcher for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, tells the Times that Google "is fundamentally an advertising company, so it's unlikely that they will ever have a business interest in making Chrome more privacy friendly."

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How Should Open Source Development Be Subsidized? - 23 Jun 2018 at 11:34pm - "Open source maintainers are exhausted and rarely paid," writes TechCrunch's editorial manager. "A new generation wants to change the economics." An anonymous reader quotes their report: [Patreon] is increasingly being used by notable open source contributors as a way to connect with fans and sustain their work... For those who hit it big, the revenues can be outsized. Evan You, who created the popular JavaScript frontend library Vue.js, has reached $15,206 in monthly earnings ($182,472 a year) from 231 patrons... While Patreon is one direct approach for generating revenues from users, another one is to offer dual licenses, one free and one commercial... Companies care about proper licensing, and that becomes the leverage to gain revenue while still maintaining the openness and spirit of open source software... Tidelift is designed to offer assurances "around areas like security, licensing, and maintenance of software," CEO Donald Fischer explained... In addition, Tidelift handles the mundane tasks of setting up open source for commercialization such as handling licensing issues... Open Collective wants to open source the monetization of open source itself. Open Collective is a non-profit platform that provides tools to "collectives" to receive money while also offering mechanisms to allow the members of those collectives to spend their money in a democratic and transparent way. TechCrunch warns that "It's not just that people are free riding, it's often that they don't even realize it. Software engineers can easily forget just how much craftsmanship has gone into the open source code that powers the most basic of applications... "If you work at a for-profit company, take the lead in finding a way to support the code that allows you to do your job so efficiently. The decentralization and volunteer spirit of the open source community needs exactly the same kind of decentralized spirit in every financial contributor. Sustainability is each of our jobs, every day."

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Cell-sized 'microlasers' could regulate brain activity - 23 Jun 2018 at 11:11pm - Scientists have spent years creating ever-smaller lasers. Berkeley Lab's latest invention, however, is something special -- and could lead to a significant change in medicine. An international team at the school has developed "microlasers" that are s...

George Lucas's Terrible Idea for Star Wars Episodes 7-9 - 23 Jun 2018 at 9:36pm - In an interview with James Cameron, George Lucas reveals what he'd planed for the final three Star Wars films: "[The next three 'Star Wars' films] were going to get into a microbiotic world," he told Cameron. "There's this world of creatures that operate differently than we do. I call them the Whills. And the Whills are the ones who actually control the universe. They feed off the Force...." In terms of his storytelling, Lucas regarded individuals as "vehicles for the Whills to travel around in... And the conduit is the midi-chlorians. The midi-chlorians are the ones that communicate with the Whills. The Whills, in a general sense, they are the Force." Lucas is confident that had he kept his company, the Whills-focused films "would have been done. Of course, a lot of the fans would have hated it, just like they did 'Phantom Menace' and everything, but at least the whole story from beginning to end would be told." Lucas acknowledges in the interview that "Everybody hated it in 'Phantom Menace' [when] we started talking about midi-chlorians," prompting one Ars Technica editor to add "Because it was a really dumb idea." He speculates that if the final three Star Wars movies followed Lucas's original plan, "Imagine, if you can, our heroes shrinking down like the Fantastic Voyage to go meet some midi-chlorians." Knowing Lucas's plans for the franchise "should make every Star Wars fan send a note of gratitude to whoever at Disney decided to buy the franchise and take it away and out from under Lucas' control."

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'Snapdragon 1000' chip may be designed for PCs from the ground up - 23 Jun 2018 at 9:24pm - Qualcomm's Snapdragon 850 processor may be intended for PCs, but it's still a half step -- it's really a higher-clocked version of the same processor you'd find in your phone. The company may be more adventurous the next time, though. WinFuture say...

Scientists are building a DNA database to fight illegal logging - 23 Jun 2018 at 7:42pm - DNA evidence could put criminals behind bars, but only if there's something to compare it to. That's why a project that aims to combat illegal logging is now building a DNA database of trees, which could help authorities determine if logs being sold...

Can Two Injections of Tuberculosis Vaccine Cure Diabetes? - 23 Jun 2018 at 7:37pm - An anonymous reader quotes Fortune: The causes of Type 1 diabetes can be significantly reversed over several years with just two injections of a common tuberculosis vaccine injected a few weeks apart, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital announced Thursday in a paper published in the journal Nature. Researchers found a substantial reduction in the blood-sugar marker HbA1c that is used to diagnose diabetes. All subjects with diabetes who received the vaccine had a 10% reduction after three years and 18% after four years, bringing them below the cutoff point for a clinical diagnosis. Those subjects followed for a full eight years retained most of the reduction. Participants who received a placebo or were in a reference group that followed normal diabetic management saw their blood sugar measurement rise by a few percentage points during the same periods followed... A 10% reduction in Hb1Ac reduces the risk of death as a result of diabetes by 21%, and drops by 37% other complications, like blindness and loss of feeling in hands and feet, according to a 2000 study.

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Tesla Autopilot Safety Defeat Device Gets a Cease-and-Desist From NHTSA - 23 Jun 2018 at 6:41pm - schwit1 writes: The National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA) is cracking down on a device that was designed to trick Tesla's semi-autonomous Autopilot feature into thinking a driver is paying attention, in order to extend the amount of time that it will operate without anyone touching the steering wheel. NHTSA announced on Tuesday that it has sent a cease and desist letter to the makers of Autopilot Buddy, and has given the company until June 29 to end sales and distribution of the $199 product. The device is a two-piece weighted hoop with magnets that wraps around a steering wheel spoke and registers with the car's sensors as a hand on the wheel. Autopilot is programmed to disengage after a short period of time if the driver is not touching the wheel and ignores a series of alerts to take control.unity.

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World's tiniest 'computer' makes a grain of rice seem massive - 23 Jun 2018 at 5:59pm - You didn't think scientists would let IBM's "world's smallest computer" boast go unchallenged, did you? Sure enough, University of Michigan has produced a temperature sensing 'computer' measuring 0.04 cubic millimeters, or about a tenth the size of I...

Can NASA Protect Earth from Catastrophic Asteroid Collisions? - 23 Jun 2018 at 5:45pm - An anonymous reader quotes Qz: NASA is not going to be able to find all the asteroids big enough to cause serious devastation on Earth by 2020 -- or even 2033. Also: For a hypothetical attempt to send a spacecraft to divert an seriously dangerous incoming asteroid, we'll need a ten year heads-up to build it and get it to the asteroid. The good news? They're working on it. "If a real threat does arise, we are prepared to pull together the information about what options might work and provide that information to decision-makers," Lindley Johnson, NASA's Planetary Defense Officer, told reporters. But NASA's methodology is now being criticized by former Microsoft CTO Nathan Myhrvold -- in the peer-reviewed journal Icarus. An anonymous reader quotes Scientific American: Since 2016, Nathan Myhrvold has argued that there are fatal flaws in the data from NASA's NEOWISE mission to hunt space rocks... NASA is working to develop a follow-up space telescope that would use the same scientific approach to fulfill a mandate from the US Congress to discover nearly all of the space rocks that could pose a threat to Earth. After 18 months of peer review, and plenty of acrimony on both sides, Myhrvold's latest critique appeared on 22 May on the website of the journal Icarus. Among other things, he argues that NEOWISE estimates of asteroid diameters should not be trusted -- a crucial challenge, because the size of an asteroid determines how much damage it would cause if it hit Earth. "These observations are the best we're going to have for a very long time," says Myhrvold. "And they weren't really analysed very well at all." NASA hasn't responded in detail to Myhrvold's criticism, though a June 14th statement said their team "stands by its data and scientific findings," noting that they'd also been published in several peer-reviewed journals.

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America's 'CyberWar' With Foreign Governments Could Get More Aggressive - 23 Jun 2018 at 4:37pm - America's Department of Defense "has quietly empowered the United States Cyber Command to take a far more aggressive approach to defending the nation against cyberattacks, a shift in strategy that could increase the risk of conflict with the foreign states that sponsor malicious hacking groups," reports the New York Times. Long-time Slashdot reader TheSauce shares their report: In the spring, as the Pentagon elevated the command's status, it opened the door to nearly daily raids on foreign networks, seeking to disable cyberweapons before they can be unleashed, according to strategy documents and military and intelligence officials... The new strategy envisions constant, disruptive "short of war" activities in foreign computer networks... "Continuous engagement imposes tactical friction and strategic costs on our adversaries, compelling them to shift resources to defense and reduce attacks"... The risks of escalation -- of U.S. action in foreign networks leading to retaliatory strikes against U.S. banks, dams, financial markets or communications networks -- are considerable, according to current and former officials... The chief risk is that the internet becomes a battleground of all-against-all, as nations not only place "implants" in the networks of their adversaries -- something the United States, China, Russia, Iran and North Korea have done with varying levels of sophistication -- but also begin to engage in daily attack and counterattack. An article shared by schwit1 notes that officials in the Obama administration "were also worried that a vigorous cyber response...could escalate into a full scale cyber war." Yet the Times reports that this new policy reflects "a widespread view that the United States has mounted an inadequate defense against the rising number of attacks aimed at America."

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Mercedes pulls its plug-in hybrids to prepare for new models - 23 Jun 2018 at 4:20pm - We hope you weren't dead set on buying one of Mercedes' existing plug-in hybrids, as they won't be long for this world. Autocar has learned that Mercedes has stopped producing PHEV versions of the C-Class, E-Class, S-Class and GLE. This doesn't mea...

Security researcher bypasses iPhone's limit on passcode attempts (updated) - 23 Jun 2018 at 2:48pm - It's not easy breaking into a locked iPhone. Try too many times and you can get locked out for years, even decades, or lose the device's data altogether. That's why law enforcement had to put pressure on Apple to unlock the San Bernardino shooter's i...

Tesla's Model 3 catches up on Autopilot and WiFi features - 23 Jun 2018 at 1:17pm - Tesla is still rushing to give the Model 3 some of the features you might take for granted in its EV stablemates. As part of a broader update across the lineup (including increased Autopilot nagging), Model 3 units now support a few key features, mos...

Apple quietly kills Modern Buckle Watch band in the US - 23 Jun 2018 at 11:46am - Apple regularly kills off products in silence, simply yanking it from stores without so much as a notice. That's how its super expensive gold Edition watches and even something as big as the iPod Classic went the way of the dodo. This time, Apple has...

Recommended Reading: The rise of 'Desus & Mero' - 23 Jun 2018 at 10:15am - How 'Desus & Mero' conquered late night Jazmine Hughes, The New York Times It's nothing new for a popular podcast to make the leap to a television show or movie, but that's not stopping Showtime. This week, the network tapped Desus Nice and Th...

The Morning After: Weekend Edition - 23 Jun 2018 at 8:45am - Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. Welcome to the weekend. Before looking back at some highlights from the last week, you should take a minute to find out what's up with Babylon 5 on Amazon Prime and get all the details on a key Supreme Court rul...

Electric GT's first race-spec Tesla Model S hits the track - 23 Jun 2018 at 7:25am - Two years ago, we learned that a Tesla Model S-based electric racing series was in development. This week Electric GT holdings showed off its first race-spec Model S P100DL in Barcelona ahead of the series' planned debut in November. Its builders say...

Snapdragon-based Chromebook could rival always-connected PCs - 23 Jun 2018 at 3:46am - You don't have great choices for non-Intel processors on Chromebooks at the moment -- the Rockchip-made parts you often see in low-end systems keep costs down, but they struggle with intensive tasks. That might not be an issue in the future. About...

Valve's Knuckles EV2 controller will let you squeeze things in VR - 22 Jun 2018 at 11:55pm - Valve originally introduced its vertical-grip "Knuckles" controllers for VR in 2016, and shipped working models to developers last year. Now the company sending game makers another version, the EV2, that has revamped buttons, straps and a slew of sen...

A World Cup match was the 'most-watched' Spanish livestream ever - 22 Jun 2018 at 10:27pm - The World Cup started last week, and with all the livestreaming options, it's no surprise that the matches have already attracted an enormous amount of views. But yesterday's match between Argentina and Croatia broke a new record when its Telemundo d...

Facebook accidentally sent developer reports to app testers - 22 Jun 2018 at 8:47pm - While Facebook is still reeling from it's Cambridge Analytica scandal, it has been trying to clean up its image as a company that plays fast and loose with your privacy. Unfortunately, there's yet another issue. According to TechCrunch, Facebook acci...

A week of speedrunning for charity starts Sunday - 22 Jun 2018 at 7:16pm - Summer Games Done Quick is back once again. Live from Minnesota, you can watch folks play through your favorite games as fast as they can, for charity. It starts Sunday afternoon at 12:30 PM Eastern and is scheduled to run until the wee hours next Su...

Apple will repair 'sticky' MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards - 22 Jun 2018 at 5:45pm - Apple launched a new keyboard service program today, acknowledging that the keyboards on certain MacBook and MacBook Pro models are prone to issues. If users of particular models find that letters or characters repeat unexpectedly or don't appear at...

California bill could be a major boost to personal data privacy - 22 Jun 2018 at 5:25pm - California legislators have introduced a bill that would give the state's residents more control over their online data and notably, would take the place of a proposed ballot measure that has been rigorously opposed by tech companies like Amazon and...

Reddit is testing a news tab in its iOS app - 22 Jun 2018 at 4:56pm - Reddit is making it simpler to find news on the platform with a beta test of a news tab in its iOS app. You might not always want to sift through personal essays and cat photos to find news from your favorite subreddits. So, Reddit is pulling from a...

Instagram Won't Stop Showing Me the Mother's Day Photos I Don't Want to See - 19 May 2017 at 3:45pm -

After four and a half years of not speaking to my mom I?ve learned to stay away from social media on Mother?s Day.

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'World?s Hottest Pepper' Will Have You Breathing Fire, But It Won?t Kill You - 19 May 2017 at 3:40pm -

Not all hot peppers are created equal, and few are as unequal as the Dragon?s Breath chili?a new breed that may soon find itself atop the ?world?s hottest? throne. Forged by Wales horticulturalist Mike Smith, the red-orange, fingernail-sized fruit is the unintentional product of a trial of a new performance-boosting?

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Federal Agents Are Now Using ?Stingrays? to Track and Capture Undocumented Im... - 19 May 2017 at 3:11pm -

Controversial cellphone tracking technology is being deployed as a tool in President Donald Trump?s expanding effort to arrest and deport illegal US residents.

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A 'Superbug' Fungus Is Spreading Across the US - 19 May 2017 at 2:13pm -

Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from 7 to more than 122. What?s more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday.

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All the Dangerous Things You Shouldn't Be Doing With Your Fidget Spinners - 19 May 2017 at 2:09pm -

Like lawn darts, nano-magnets, and slap bracelets, fidget spinners are only one stupid stunt away from becoming yet another forgotten fad. And as usual, instead of enjoying them responsibly, the internet is hard at work trying to find ways to make spinners as dangerous as playing with firecrackers. This is why we?

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The Venom Movie Has Chosen Its Star/Symbiote Host: Tom Hardy - 19 May 2017 at 2:05pm -

Variety is reporting that Tom Hardy, who played Bane in Christopher Nolan?s The Dark Knight Rises, will next play another iconic comic book villain, Venom. The frequent Spider-Man villain is getting his own film next year, which will be directed by Ruben Fleischer, who made Zombieland.

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This Cyclops Goat Is Good - 19 May 2017 at 1:45pm -

Eight days ago, a one-eyed goat was born in the Indian state of Assam. Since then, this brave little fluff has become an international sensation for obvious reasons: clearly, it?s training to be in the X-Men.

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Inside The Russian Bomber That?s Been Flying America?s Coastline - 19 May 2017 at 1:22pm -

The Russian Tu-95/-142 Bear has been showing up in a lot of places it maybe shouldn?t be over the past month, as the Russian Air Force and Navy continues to probe the air defenses of several nations.The sixty-year-old symbol of the Cold War has been able to remain a viable weapon system despite its age, much the way?

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This Is How Miserable IBM Voice Recognition Probably Was in the '80s - 19 May 2017 at 1:13pm -

In the age of Siri, we take for granted how far speech recognition technology has come. But a quick glance back at 1986, when IBM introduced its voice recognition software, shows that we?ve travelled light years since the earliest version of this game-changing software. And it?s even more fun in satire form.

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Automate An Outlet With TP-Link's Alexa-Compatible Smart Plug, Now Just $21 - 19 May 2017 at 12:50pm -

Like the idea of a Belkin WeMo Switch, but not willing to spend $40-$50 to try one out? This TP-Link alternative has a nearly identical feature set for half the price.

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Flat Earthers Won't Believe This News on Antarctica?s Climate - 19 May 2017 at 12:39pm -

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we?re overlooking a basic reality of geometry.

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I'm Afraid to Ask The Internet to Name This New Moon - 19 May 2017 at 12:10pm -

Good news! Three space telescopes, including Hubble, have combined their celestial powers to spot a moon orbiting a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt ?the region beyond Neptune where Pluto and countless other icy bodies live. According to NASA, the dwarf planet?s moon has lots to teach scientists about how moons formed?

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Rudy Giuliani Forgot 9/11('s Effect on Commercial Air Travel) - 19 May 2017 at 11:30am -

Yesterday morning, Rudy Giuliani?America?s mayor, Donald Trump?s current cybersecurity advisor, and a race-baiting thug most famous for being circumstantially tied to a great tragedy?had a little dust-up with the TSA while making his way through Newark airport. Apparently, the former mayor who famously saw his city?

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Google's Coolest Tech Is Getting Harder and Harder to See - 19 May 2017 at 11:25am -

Google always uses its annual I/O developer conference as a place to trot out some of its biggest and most exciting product updates. You?d be forgiven for feeling like this year was kind of a dud. There were no new gadgets, no new moonshot projects, and not even cool new swag like Google Cardboard headsets. The?

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The First AI-Generated Paint Names Include 'Homestar Brown' and 'Stanky Bean' - 19 May 2017 at 11:20am -

Humans aren?t nearly as creative as we think. Craft brewers, for example, have run out of fun names and are sending each other cease and desist letters for coming up with the same ideas. So, what if we let computers come up with new names for us?

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Duck Me, Ducktales Has Added Lin-Manuel Miranda as Gizmoduck - 19 May 2017 at 11:14am -

Man, the cast for the new DuckTales cartoon was already pretty insane. And now it just got even better.

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'Panda' Porpoise Could Be Extinct In Months - 19 May 2017 at 11:10am -

Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one. These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world? the Northern Gulf of California. Their nickname?the ?panda? porpoise?comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of?

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Sad, Sick Idiot Anthony Weiner to Plead Guilty to Sexting 15-Year-Old Girl - 19 May 2017 at 11:03am -

Early Friday morning, former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner surrendered himself to FBI agents and will appear before a federal judge later this afternoon. There, he will plead guilty to transferring obscene material to a minor, multiple news outlets report.

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Uber Threatens to Dump Engineer Accused of Stealing Trade Secrets From Waymo - 19 May 2017 at 10:50am -

Lots of people get fired from Uber. One employee was reportedly fired last year for helping his female coworkers raise complaints about sexual harassment. Drivers get deactivated from the platform if their ratings slip below a certain number (Uber says the minimum rating varies by city, but driver forums say dipping?

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Today's Best Deals: Under Armour Apparel, Kamado Grill, SoundBuds, and More - 19 May 2017 at 10:28am -

Anker?s newest SoundBuds, a Big Green Egg alternative, and a huge Under Armour apparel sale lead off Friday?s best deals from around the web.

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