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Quantum Leap From Australian Research Promises Super-Fast Computing Power - 20 Jul 2019 at 2:00am - An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Simmons, a former Australian of the Year, and her team at the University of New South Wales announced in a paper published in Nature journal on Thursday that they have been able to achieve the first two-qubit gate between atom qubits in silicon, allowing them to communicate with each other at a 200 times faster rate than previously achieved at 0.8 nanoseconds. A two-qubit gate operates like a logic gate in traditional computing, and the team at UNSW was able to achieve the faster operation by putting the two atom qubits closer together than ever before -- just 13 nanometers -- and in real-time controllably observing and measuring their spin states. A scanning tunneling microscope was used to place the atoms in silicon after the optimal distance between the two qubits had been worked out. The research has been two decades in the making, after researchers in Australia opted to build a quantum computer on silicon material.

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Report: FTC approves a fine for Google over YouTube kids privacy probe - 20 Jul 2019 at 12:32am - Google has to pay the FTC a multimillion dollar fine to settle a probe into YouTube's shortcomings when it comes to protecting kids using its service, according to The Washington Post. The agency launched an investigation into the video-sharing platf...

Professor Patrick Winston, Former Director of MIT's Artificial Intelligence L... - 19 Jul 2019 at 11:30pm - Patrick Winston, a beloved professor and computer scientist at MIT, died on July 19 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He was 76. MIT News reports: A professor at MIT for almost 50 years, Winston was director of MIT's Artificial Intelligence Laboratory from 1972 to 1997 before it merged with the Laboratory for Computer Science to become MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). A devoted teacher and cherished colleague, Winston led CSAIL's Genesis Group, which focused on developing AI systems that have human-like intelligence, including the ability to tell, perceive, and comprehend stories. He believed that such work could help illuminate aspects of human intelligence that scientists don't yet understand. He was renowned for his accessible and informative lectures, and gave a hugely popular talk every year during the Independent Activities Period called "How to Speak." Winston's dedication to teaching earned him many accolades over the years, including the Baker Award, the Eta Kappa Nu Teaching Award, and the Graduate Student Council Teaching Award.

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Equifax reportedly close to $700 million data breach settlement - 19 Jul 2019 at 10:47pm - Remember that time Equifax had a data breach and leaked an incredible amount of information -- addresses, social security numbers and even driver's licenses -- on more than 143 million people in the US alone? That was revealed nearly two years ago, a...

James Bond Was Going To Fight Robot Sharks With Nukes In New York's Sewers - 19 Jul 2019 at 10:03pm - dryriver writes: The line "sharks with fricking lasers" was once popular on Slashdot. It sounds like a joke, but a never-made James Bond movie co-written back in the day by Sean Connery was actually going to feature robotic sharks carrying stolen NATO nukes in order to attack New York. Bond was going to stop the sharks inside the New York sewer system, waterski out of the sewers, paraglide up to the Statue of Liberty's head, then fight a Bond villain inside said head, with the villain's "blood trickling out of the Statue of Liberty's eye like tears" at the end of the fight. All this was going to happen without the consent of Cubby Broccoli, the official producer of the Bond movies. Why did the movie never get made? The producers of competing Bond movies were fighting in court over who has what rights to the franchise and characters. In the end, "Bond fights robot sharks with nukes" was scrapped, and "Never Say Never Again," a remake of "Thunderball," was made instead. This featured stolen nukes as well, but unfortunately no robot sharks or other "Austin Powers" style silliness.

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'The Dark Crystal' Comic-Con preview goes behind the scenes - 19 Jul 2019 at 9:32pm - Besides The Witcher, Netflix also highlighted its upcoming The Dark Crystal prequel series at Comic-Con. Instead of another trailer, the video posted goes behind the scenes, talking to engineers and others at Jim Henson Company who have continued the...

A California Bill Could Destroy Uber's Unsustainable Business Model - 19 Jul 2019 at 9:25pm - Last week, the California Senate's Labor, Public Employment and Retirement Committee held a hearing and passed Assembly Bill 5 (AB5), which promises to make it harder for companies to claim workers are independent contractors and increase the operating expenses of Uber, Lyft, and other on-demand companies that already find themselves unable to turn a profit. Motherboard reports: Written by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzelez (D-San Diego), AB5 codifies the California Supreme Court's unanimous May 2018 ruling in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles where an "ABC test" was introduced to determine whether a worker was an employee or an independent contractor. Individuals with sufficient control over how and when they did their work are independent contractors, while workers without much control are employees. While AB5 easily passed in the Assembly this May, 53-11, it has a long and ugly fight ahead of as it must pass multiple votes in the Senate then be signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom. Each step of the way is an opportunity for companies like Uber and Lyft to intervene and extract concessions. Uber has never made a profit and has actually lost over $14 billion in the last four years alone. In the prospectus, Uber insists that these five major metropolitan markets are essential to its path to profitability. In reality, what Uber actually relies on is the $20 billion in funding raised over the past decade and the $8 billion in new investments after going public in May. This investor welfare covers the cost of low prices that render each rideshare trip unprofitable, of driver incentives to combat the high turnover rate of drivers, and of promotions used to drive up demand. Equity research analysts at Barclays project Uber is on track to lose $3.9 billion in 2019 and if AB5 were passed, it would cost the company upwards of an additional $500 million. A drop in the bucket. But if AB5 were to become law and other states follow California's example and pass similar laws, it could constrict these companies' already narrow paths to profitability.

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New York Signs Biggest Offshore Wind Project Deal In the Nation - 19 Jul 2019 at 8:45pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: New York has signed the biggest-ever deals for offshore wind power in U.S. history, a key part of the state's plan to get all of its power from emissions-free sources by 2040. On Thursday, Governor Andrew Cuomo awarded contracts for two projects off Long Island that will total 1,700 megawatts in capacity. Equinor ASA and a joint venture between Denmark's Orsted A/S and Massachusetts-based Eversource Energy were chosen to build the farms, which will supply enough power to light up a million homes. Cuomo is counting on the wind projects to achieve the most aggressive clean energy goal in the U.S., and signed the state's 100% renewable energy target into law right after announcing the wind contracts. New York's ultimate plan is to get enough turbines erected off its shores to generate 9,000 megawatts by 2035. The contracted wind farms will be completed by 2024, he said. Based on cost estimates from BloombergNEF, the projects may be valued at more than $5 billion.

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Alaska's Engineering Colleges Prepare To Slash Programs, Lay Off Faculty - 19 Jul 2019 at 8:25pm - In response to Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy's dramatic budget cuts to the state's only public institution of higher education, the University of Alaska's engineering colleges in Fairbanks and Anchorage are preparing to cut faculty members and slash a number of programs. "Dozens of engineering faculty, researchers, and staff could see their positions eliminated, and even tenured faculty members could lose their jobs. Students may not be able to finish their degrees in the programs or locations in which they started," reports IEEE Spectrum. "Many engineering students have already lost merit-based scholarships promised to them via the Alaska Performance Scholarship program." From the report: On 28 June, Gov. Dunleavy vetoed US $130 million in state funding for the University of Alaska system for the fiscal year that began on 1 July -- a step he said was necessary to contend with the state's $1.6 billion budget deficit, inflicted in large part by sluggish oil prices. Those cuts came on top of a $5 million reduction proposed by Alaska's legislature. Overall, state funding for the University of Alaska has been reduced by $136 million [PDF], or 41 percent, for the fiscal year that began 1 July. That translates to a 17 percent reduction to the University of Alaska's total operating budget. Citing reputational damage caused by these cuts, the University of Alaska's Board of Regents expects tuition, grant funding, and charitable donations to also drop, adding to a total loss of more than $200 million [PDF] in funding for the current fiscal year. The University of Alaska is now widely expected to declare financial exigency [PDF], an emergency status that would allow administrators to take extreme measures to reduce costs by closing campuses, slashing salaries and programs, or laying off tenured faculty. However, closing the university's flagship Fairbanks campus would still not be enough to cover the shortfall. In response to budget cuts in previous years, the university has already suspended or discontinued more than 50 degree programs and certificates, including its MS in Engineering Management program.

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Emotion-Detection Applications Are Built On Outdated Science, Report Warns - 19 Jul 2019 at 8:03pm - maiden_taiwan writes: Can computers determine your emotional state from your face? A panel of senior scientists with backgrounds in neuroscience, psychology, computer science, electrical engineering, biology, anthropology, psychiatry, pediatrics, and public affairs spent two years reviewing over 1,000 research papers on the topic. Two years later, they have published the most comprehensive analysis to date and concluded: "It is not possible to confidently infer happiness from a smile, anger from a scowl, or sadness from a frown, as much of current technology tries to do when applying what are mistakenly believed to be the scientific facts.... [How] people communicate anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise varies substantially across cultures, situations, and even across people within a single situation." Neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett, author of the book How Emotions are Made and behind a popular TED talk on emotion, who was an author on the paper, further elaborates: "People scowl when angry, on average, approximately 25 percent of the time, but they move their faces in other meaningful ways when angry. They might cry, or smile, or widen their eyes and gasp. And they also scowl when not angry, such as when they are concentrating or when they have a stomach ache. Similarly, most smiles don't imply that a person is happy, and most of the time people who are happy do something other than smile." The American Civil Liberties Union has also commented on the impact of the study. "This paper is significant because an entire industry of automated purported emotion-reading technologies is quickly emerging," writes the ACLU. "As we wrote in our recent paper on 'Robot Surveillance,' the market for emotion recognition software is forecast to reach at least $3.8 billion by 2025. Emotion recognition (aka 'affect recognition' or 'affective computing') is already being incorporated into products for purposes such as marketing, robotics, driver safety, and (as we recently wrote about) audio 'aggression detectors.'"

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Netflix's 'The Witcher' teaser trailer revealed at Comic-Con - 19 Jul 2019 at 7:57pm - Late last year we learned that The Witcher's TV adaptation found its Geralt in the form of Superman star Henry Cavill, and now at Comic-Con fans have their first glimpse of the live-action series coming to Netflix. The teaser trailer was unveiled at...

QuickBooks Cloud Hosting Firm iNSYNQ Hit In Ransomware Attack - 19 Jul 2019 at 7:20pm - Cloud hosting provider iNSYNQ says it was hit with a ransomware attack that shut down its network and left customers unable to access their accounting data for the past three days. "Unfortunately for iNSYNQ, the company appears to be turning a deaf ear to the increasingly anxious cries from its users for more information about the incident," reports Krebs On Security." From the report: Gig Harbor, Wash.-based iNSYNQ specializes in providing cloud-based QuickBooks accounting software and services. In a statement posted to its status page, iNSYNQ said it experienced a ransomware attack on July 16, and took its network offline in a bid to contain the spread of the malware. "The attack impacted data belonging to certain iNSYNQ clients, rendering such data inaccessible,"; the company said. "As soon as iNSYNQ discovered the attack, iNSYNQ took steps to contain it. This included turning off some servers in the iNSYNQ environment." iNSYNQ said it has engaged outside cybersecurity assistance and to determine whether any customer data was accessed without authorization, but that so far it has no estimate for when those files might be available again to customers.

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Huawei CEO: Entity List ban is 'the start of the US falling behind' - 19 Jul 2019 at 6:47pm - It's been a tumultuous year for Huawei's businesses in the US, and the company's highest-ranking officials are speaking out. Founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei spoke with Yahoo Finance in an hour-long interview published today, explaining the company's pla...

Chrome 76 Prevents NYT and Other News Sites From Detecting Incognito Mode - 19 Jul 2019 at 6:40pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Google Chrome 76 will close a loophole that websites use to detect when people use the browser's Incognito Mode. Over the past couple of years, you may have noticed some websites preventing you from reading articles while using a browser's private mode. The Boston Globe began doing this in 2017, requiring people to log in to paid subscriber accounts in order to read in private mode. The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and other newspapers impose identical restrictions. Chrome 76 -- which is in beta now and is scheduled to hit the stable channel on July 30 -- prevents these websites from discovering that you're in private mode. Google explained the change yesterday in a blog post titled, "Protecting private browsing in Chrome." Google wrote: "Today, some sites use an unintended loophole to detect when people are browsing in Incognito Mode. Chrome's FileSystem API is disabled in Incognito Mode to avoid leaving traces of activity on someone's device. Sites can check for the availability of the FileSystem API and, if they receive an error message, determine that a private session is occurring and give the user a different experience. With the release of Chrome 76 scheduled for July 30, the behavior of the FileSystem API will be modified to remedy this method of Incognito Mode detection." If websites find new loopholes to detect private mode, Google said they will close those, too. "Chrome will likewise work to remedy any other current or future means of Incognito Mode detection," Google's blog post said.

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Smart Money Said 'Skip Bitcoin, Bet on Blockchain.' Not Any More - 19 Jul 2019 at 6:05pm - As cryptocurrency prices tumbled across the board last year, venture capitalists focused their attention on the promise of the underlying technology, the ledger known as blockchain. That, many said, was the smarter bet. Now, the tables have turned. From a report: While Bitcoin's price has rebounded this year, a fresh batch of data shows the flow of cash into blockchain startups dropped dramatically. So far, traditional venture capital investments in blockchain companies have totaled $784 million via 227 deals, according to CB Insights. At that pace, businesses focusing on that technology may only draw $1.6 billion this year, down roughly 60% from a record $4.1 billion in 2018, the research firm said. Money coming from corporations is on "an even sharper decline," despite interest from companies such as Facebook in creating their own digital coins, CB Insights said. Maturing startups are drawing less support, while young startups are faring better, it said.

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Eli Roth?s studio is making five horror series for Facebook Watch - 19 Jul 2019 at 6:03pm - Last fall, Crypt TV announced it would convert its Webby Award-winning short The Birch into a 15-episode horror series for Facebook Watch. The digital studio, founded by Eli Roth and Jack Davis, isn't stopping there. According to Deadline, Crypt TV a...

Arctic Summer Melt Shows Ice Is Disappearing Faster Than Normal - 19 Jul 2019 at 5:26pm - Ice covering the Arctic Ocean reached the second-lowest level recorded for this time of year after July temperatures spiked in areas around the North Pole. From a report: The rate of ice loss in the region is a crucial indicator for the world's climate and a closely-watched metric by bordering nations jostling for resources and trade routes. This month's melt is tracking close to the record set in July 2012, the Colorado-based National Snow & Ice Data Center said in a statement. This year's heatwave in the Arctic Circle has led to record temperatures in areas of Alaska, Canada and Greenland, extending long-term trends of more ice disappearing. Ice flows are melting faster than average rates observed over the last three decades, losing an additional 20,000 square kilometers (12,427 miles) of cover per day -- an area about the size of Wales. Ice begins melting in the Arctic as spring approaches in the northern hemisphere, and then it usually starts building again toward the end of September as the days grow shorter and cooler. The U.K.'s Met Office said that the chance of a record low by September "is higher than it has been in the previous few years." This summer, several dramatic images showing the pace and extent of Arctic ice melt have been seen around the world underlining the harsh reality of global warming and the struggle governments face in trying to slow it down. Globally, June was the hottest year on record, according to the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service.

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US Netflix subscribers can finally watch Eurovision replays - 19 Jul 2019 at 5:23pm - Americans didn't have official ways to watch the Eurovision Song Contest live this year, but they'll at least have a way to relive it. Netflix will carry the 2019 competition's semi-finals and grand final in the US starting on July 22nd, giving you e...

My Browser, the Spy: How Extensions Slurped Up Browsing Histories From 4M Users - 19 Jul 2019 at 4:45pm - Dan Goodin, reporting for ArsTechnica: When we use browsers to make medical appointments, share tax returns with accountants, or access corporate intranets, we usually trust that the pages we access will remain private. DataSpii, a newly documented privacy issue in which millions of people's browsing histories have been collected and exposed, shows just how much about us is revealed when that assumption is turned on its head. DataSpii begins with browser extensions -- available mostly for Chrome but in more limited cases for Firefox as well -- that, by Google's account, had as many as 4.1 million users. These extensions collected the URLs, webpage titles, and in some cases the embedded hyperlinks of every page that the browser user visited. Most of these collected Web histories were then published by a fee-based service called Nacho Analytics, which markets itself as "God mode for the Internet" and uses the tag line "See Anyone's Analytics Account." Web histories may not sound especially sensitive, but a subset of the published links led to pages that are not protected by passwords -- but only by a hard-to-guess sequence of characters (called tokens) included in the URL. Thus, the published links could allow viewers to access the content at these pages. (Security practitioners have long discouraged the publishing of sensitive information on pages that aren't password protected, but the practice remains widespread.) Further reading: More on DataSpii: How extensions hide their data grabs -- and how they're discovered.

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Hulu's Comic-Con surprise: 'Veronica Mars' S4 is streaming now - 19 Jul 2019 at 4:39pm - Forget waiting until July 26th, during a panel at Comic-Con Veronica Mars star Kristen Bell announced season four of the relaunched series is premiering today on Hulu. All eight episodes are live right now, so if you're not at the event it's a perfec...

A Rust-Based TLS Library Outperformed OpenSSL in Almost Every Category - 19 Jul 2019 at 4:05pm - A tiny and relatively unknown TLS library written in Rust, an up-and-coming programming language, outperformed the industry-standard OpenSSL in almost every major category. From a report: The findings are the result of a recent four-part series of benchmarks carried out by Joseph Birr-Pixton, the developer behind the Rustls library. The findings showed that Rustls was 10% faster when setting up and negotiating a new server connection, and between 20 and 40% faster when setting up a client connection. But while handshake speeds for new TLS connections are important, most TLS traffic relies on resuming previously negotiated handshakes. Here, too, Rustls outperformed the aging OpenSSL, being between 10 and 20% in resuming a connection on the server-side, and being between 30 and 70% quicker to resume a client connection. Furthermore, Rustls also fared better in sheer bulk performance -- or the speed at which data is transferred over the TLS connection. Birr-Pixton said Rustls could send data 15% faster than OpenSSL, and receive it 5% faster as well.

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Researchers Have Teamed Up in India To Build a Gigantic Store of Texts and Im... - 19 Jul 2019 at 3:25pm - A giant data store quietly being built in India could free vast swathes of science for computer analysis -- but whether it is a legal pursuit remains unclear. From a report: Carl Malamud is on a crusade to liberate information locked up behind paywalls -- and his campaigns have scored many victories. He has spent decades publishing copyrighted legal documents, from building codes to court records, and then arguing that such texts represent public-domain law that ought to be available to any citizen online. Sometimes, he has won those arguments in court. Now, the 60-year-old American technologist is turning his sights on a new objective: freeing paywalled scientific literature. And he thinks he has a legal way to do it. Over the past year, Malamud has -- without asking publishers -- teamed up with Indian researchers to build a gigantic store of text and images extracted from 73 million journal articles dating from 1847 up to the present day. The cache, which is still being created, will be kept on a 576-terabyte storage facility at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) in New Delhi. "This is not every journal article ever written, but it's a lot," Malamud says. It's comparable to the size of the core collection in the Web of Science database, for instance. Malamud and his JNU collaborator, bioinformatician Andrew Lynn, call their facility the JNU data depot. No one will be allowed to read or download work from the repository, because that would breach publishers' copyright. Instead, Malamud envisages, researchers could crawl over its text and data with computer software, scanning through the world's scientific literature to pull out insights without actually reading the text. The unprecedented project is generating much excitement because it could, for the first time, open up vast swathes of the paywalled literature for easy computerized analysis. Dozens of research groups already mine papers to build databases of genes and chemicals, map associations between proteins and diseases, and generate useful scientific hypotheses. But publishers control -- and often limit -- the speed and scope of such projects, which typically confine themselves to abstracts, not full text. Researchers in India, the United States and the United Kingdom are already making plans to use the JNU store instead. Malamud and Lynn have held workshops at Indian government laboratories and universities to explain the idea. "We bring in professors and explain what we are doing. They get all excited and they say, 'Oh gosh, this is wonderful'," says Malamud. But the depot's legal status isn't yet clear. Malamud, who contacted several intellectual-property (IP) lawyers before starting work on the depot, hopes to avoid a lawsuit.

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Parrot plans to retire its Mambo and Swing drones - 19 Jul 2019 at 3:24pm - Drone company Parrot, maker of the Anafi 4K folding drone, is reportedly leaving the mini-drone market. Parrot has been shifting its focus away from consumer drones since 2017, but it's been a slow transition. This week, Wirecutter confirmed that Par...

Bloodborne's atmospheric score is getting a vinyl release - 19 Jul 2019 at 2:52pm - Bloodborne is one of the most lauded titles of the current console generation, and a key ingredient in making FromSoftware's game so memorable for so many is its delectably dark soundtrack. The atmospheric score by Ryan Amon, Tsukasa Saitoh, Michael...

YouTube Executive Says the Video Service Doesn't Drive Its Users Down the Rab... - 19 Jul 2019 at 2:45pm - YouTube has defended its video recommendation algorithms, amid suggestions that the technology serves up increasingly extreme videos. On Thursday, a BBC report explored how YouTube had helped the Flat Earth conspiracy theory spread. But the company's new managing director for the UK, Ben McOwen Wilson, said YouTube "does the opposite of taking you down the rabbit hole". From a report: He told the BBC that YouTube worked to dispel misinformation and conspiracies. But warned that some types of government regulation could start to look like censorship. YouTube, as well as other internet giants such as Facebook and Twitter, have some big decisions to make. All must decide where they draw the line between freedom of expression, hateful content and misinformation. And the government is watching. It has published a White Paper laying out its plans to regulate online platforms. In his first interview since starting his new role, Ben spoke about the company's algorithms, its approach to hate speech and what it expects from the UK government's "online harms" legislation. [...] YouTube has never explained exactly how its algorithms work. Critics say the platform offers up increasingly sensationalist and conspiratorial videos. Mr McOwen Wilson disagrees. "It's what's great about YouTube. It is what brings you from one small area and actually expands your horizon and does the opposite of taking you down the rabbit hole," he says.

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Netflix might pay Eddie Murphy $70 million for stand-up specials - 19 Jul 2019 at 2:21pm - Eddie Murphy might be better known these days for his work on the screen, but it was on the stage that he got his start. His stand-up specials Delirious and Raw are often ranked among the best ever, and Murphy has been open in recent years about want...

What to watch to celebrate Apollo 11's 50th anniversary - 19 Jul 2019 at 2:00pm - What better way to celebrate the Moon landing than to gather your family around the couch and relive the experience? Even if you weren't lucky enough to see Neil Armstrong plant his feet on the Moon fifty years ago, there are plenty of films and show...

Join the first ?Harry Potter: Wizards Unite? community day tomorrow - 19 Jul 2019 at 1:29pm - Harry Potter: Wizards Unite has been out for one month, and makers Ninantic and WB Games are ready to kick things up a notch. Tomorrow, they're launching the game's first community day. Similar to the way community days worked in Pokémon Go, t...

Readers tell us why the OnePlus 6T has earned so many fans - 19 Jul 2019 at 1:00pm - When Senior Editor Richard Lai reviewed the OnePlus 6T, new features like its distinct dewdrop notch and in-display fingerprint reader stood out to him. As the company's first offering through a US carrier and the successor to the popular OnePlus 6,...

How NASA keeps its astronauts safe and sane in space - 19 Jul 2019 at 12:30pm - Astronauts endure one of the most dangerous, high stakes, high stress professions on (or off) the planet -- a job matched in isolation, confinement and extremity perhaps only by arctic field scientists and ballistic missile submarine crews. Of course...

Twitter will help explain missing tweets in conversations - 19 Jul 2019 at 12:18pm - Twitter will soon do a better job of explaining missing tweets in your conversations. The social network is adding context to "this tweet is unavailable" notices in conversation threads to help explain just why a given post isn't readable. While Tw...

The best turntable - 19 Jul 2019 at 12:00pm - By Chris Heinonen This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and Engadget may earn affiliate commission. Read the full guide to turntables. Whether yo...

?Sky: Children of the Light? is finally available on iOS - 19 Jul 2019 at 11:49am - Thatgamecompany's Sky: Children of the Light is finally available on iOS. The title, from the creators of Journey, was announced years ago and has lived in beta limbo for a long time. Last month, Thatgamecompany said Sky would arrive on July 11th, an...

Lyft adds NYC subway directions to its app - 19 Jul 2019 at 11:26am - Lyft's support for public transportation will soon include one of the biggest mass transit systems on the planet. The ridesharing firm is rolling out access to real-time New York City subway directions through its app over the months ahead, giving lo...

NASA's plan to return to the Moon with Project Artemis - 19 Jul 2019 at 11:00am - On July 21, 1969, the first humans set foot on the Moon. With Neil Armstrong's simple words, "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," the world changed irrevocably. For a few hours, we existed on multiple worlds. That was fifty years ago...

The best personal EVs for any commute - 19 Jul 2019 at 10:30am - My commute isn't too bad. I have to walk a mile or so to the metro, ride it for about 25 minutes, and then it's a short walk from the station to the office. Driving would be exponentially more annoying (traffic) and costly (there's a $5 bridge fa...

Huawei's supposed Android alternative isn't meant for smartphones - 19 Jul 2019 at 10:19am - When Huawei trademarked its Hongmeng operating system last month, many assumed it was the long-rumored mobile OS that the company said it could use in place of Android or Windows. But that's not the case. Catherine Chen, a Huawei board member and sen...

'Iron Man VR' developers explain the game's free-roaming flight - 19 Jul 2019 at 9:29am - Gamers have been eagerly awaiting Marvel's Iron Man VR game since a hands-on demo was made available in February, and now more details have been revealed about the upcoming title. Developer Camouflaj talked to PlayStation Blog during San Diego Comic...

NVIDIA revamps Moon landing recreation in time for Apollo 11's 50th - 19 Jul 2019 at 9:00am - You knew NVIDIA couldn't resist reviving its GPU-based Apollo 11 recreation for the Moon landing's 50th anniversary. Sure enough, the tech firm has updated the demo to take advantage of its RTX ray tracing technology, allowing a more faithful rendit...

Virgin Orbit will launch small satellites for the UK military - 19 Jul 2019 at 8:28am - Virgin Orbit, the small satellite launch arm of Virgin Galactic, will provide launch capabilities for the UK's Royal Air Force (RAF). Virgin has been angling for government contracts recently and has managed to land a project called Artemis "to demon...

Instagram Won't Stop Showing Me the Mother's Day Photos I Don't Want to See - 19 May 2017 at 3:45pm -

After four and a half years of not speaking to my mom I?ve learned to stay away from social media on Mother?s Day.

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'World?s Hottest Pepper' Will Have You Breathing Fire, But It Won?t Kill You - 19 May 2017 at 3:40pm -

Not all hot peppers are created equal, and few are as unequal as the Dragon?s Breath chili?a new breed that may soon find itself atop the ?world?s hottest? throne. Forged by Wales horticulturalist Mike Smith, the red-orange, fingernail-sized fruit is the unintentional product of a trial of a new performance-boosting?

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Federal Agents Are Now Using ?Stingrays? to Track and Capture Undocumented Im... - 19 May 2017 at 3:11pm -

Controversial cellphone tracking technology is being deployed as a tool in President Donald Trump?s expanding effort to arrest and deport illegal US residents.

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A 'Superbug' Fungus Is Spreading Across the US - 19 May 2017 at 2:13pm -

Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from 7 to more than 122. What?s more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday.

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All the Dangerous Things You Shouldn't Be Doing With Your Fidget Spinners - 19 May 2017 at 2:09pm -

Like lawn darts, nano-magnets, and slap bracelets, fidget spinners are only one stupid stunt away from becoming yet another forgotten fad. And as usual, instead of enjoying them responsibly, the internet is hard at work trying to find ways to make spinners as dangerous as playing with firecrackers. This is why we?

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The Venom Movie Has Chosen Its Star/Symbiote Host: Tom Hardy - 19 May 2017 at 2:05pm -

Variety is reporting that Tom Hardy, who played Bane in Christopher Nolan?s The Dark Knight Rises, will next play another iconic comic book villain, Venom. The frequent Spider-Man villain is getting his own film next year, which will be directed by Ruben Fleischer, who made Zombieland.

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This Cyclops Goat Is Good - 19 May 2017 at 1:45pm -

Eight days ago, a one-eyed goat was born in the Indian state of Assam. Since then, this brave little fluff has become an international sensation for obvious reasons: clearly, it?s training to be in the X-Men.

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Inside The Russian Bomber That?s Been Flying America?s Coastline - 19 May 2017 at 1:22pm -

The Russian Tu-95/-142 Bear has been showing up in a lot of places it maybe shouldn?t be over the past month, as the Russian Air Force and Navy continues to probe the air defenses of several nations.The sixty-year-old symbol of the Cold War has been able to remain a viable weapon system despite its age, much the way?

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This Is How Miserable IBM Voice Recognition Probably Was in the '80s - 19 May 2017 at 1:13pm -

In the age of Siri, we take for granted how far speech recognition technology has come. But a quick glance back at 1986, when IBM introduced its voice recognition software, shows that we?ve travelled light years since the earliest version of this game-changing software. And it?s even more fun in satire form.

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Automate An Outlet With TP-Link's Alexa-Compatible Smart Plug, Now Just $21 - 19 May 2017 at 12:50pm -

Like the idea of a Belkin WeMo Switch, but not willing to spend $40-$50 to try one out? This TP-Link alternative has a nearly identical feature set for half the price.

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Flat Earthers Won't Believe This News on Antarctica?s Climate - 19 May 2017 at 12:39pm -

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we?re overlooking a basic reality of geometry.

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I'm Afraid to Ask The Internet to Name This New Moon - 19 May 2017 at 12:10pm -

Good news! Three space telescopes, including Hubble, have combined their celestial powers to spot a moon orbiting a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt ?the region beyond Neptune where Pluto and countless other icy bodies live. According to NASA, the dwarf planet?s moon has lots to teach scientists about how moons formed?

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Rudy Giuliani Forgot 9/11('s Effect on Commercial Air Travel) - 19 May 2017 at 11:30am -

Yesterday morning, Rudy Giuliani?America?s mayor, Donald Trump?s current cybersecurity advisor, and a race-baiting thug most famous for being circumstantially tied to a great tragedy?had a little dust-up with the TSA while making his way through Newark airport. Apparently, the former mayor who famously saw his city?

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Google's Coolest Tech Is Getting Harder and Harder to See - 19 May 2017 at 11:25am -

Google always uses its annual I/O developer conference as a place to trot out some of its biggest and most exciting product updates. You?d be forgiven for feeling like this year was kind of a dud. There were no new gadgets, no new moonshot projects, and not even cool new swag like Google Cardboard headsets. The?

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The First AI-Generated Paint Names Include 'Homestar Brown' and 'Stanky Bean' - 19 May 2017 at 11:20am -

Humans aren?t nearly as creative as we think. Craft brewers, for example, have run out of fun names and are sending each other cease and desist letters for coming up with the same ideas. So, what if we let computers come up with new names for us?

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Duck Me, Ducktales Has Added Lin-Manuel Miranda as Gizmoduck - 19 May 2017 at 11:14am -

Man, the cast for the new DuckTales cartoon was already pretty insane. And now it just got even better.

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'Panda' Porpoise Could Be Extinct In Months - 19 May 2017 at 11:10am -

Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one. These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world? the Northern Gulf of California. Their nickname?the ?panda? porpoise?comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of?

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Sad, Sick Idiot Anthony Weiner to Plead Guilty to Sexting 15-Year-Old Girl - 19 May 2017 at 11:03am -

Early Friday morning, former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner surrendered himself to FBI agents and will appear before a federal judge later this afternoon. There, he will plead guilty to transferring obscene material to a minor, multiple news outlets report.

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Uber Threatens to Dump Engineer Accused of Stealing Trade Secrets From Waymo - 19 May 2017 at 10:50am -

Lots of people get fired from Uber. One employee was reportedly fired last year for helping his female coworkers raise complaints about sexual harassment. Drivers get deactivated from the platform if their ratings slip below a certain number (Uber says the minimum rating varies by city, but driver forums say dipping?

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Today's Best Deals: Under Armour Apparel, Kamado Grill, SoundBuds, and More - 19 May 2017 at 10:28am -

Anker?s newest SoundBuds, a Big Green Egg alternative, and a huge Under Armour apparel sale lead off Friday?s best deals from around the web.

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