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Samsung could use AR Emoji as stand-ins during video chats - 23 Apr 2018 at 2:52pm - Samsung's AR Emoji may be useful for considerably more than the occasional funny reaction GIF. The tech giant recently received a US patent for a "hybrid visual communication" system that would replace live video of a person with an augmented realit...

A VR film forced me to confront my fear of the sea - 23 Apr 2018 at 2:30pm - The first time I realized I was terrified of whales, I was surprised. I had been scrolling through Instagram and saw a picture of a boat adrift in the ocean with the gigantic shadow of a whale below it. The hairs on the back of my neck stood, and I w...

EU Opens Competition Probe Into Apple's Bid For Music App Shazam - 23 Apr 2018 at 2:30pm - EU antitrust regulators opened an investigation on Monday into Apple's bid for British music discovery app Shazam, concerned the deal might give the iPhone maker an unfair advantage in poaching users from its rivals. From a report: Apple announced the deal in December to help it better compete with industry leader Spotify. Shazam lets users identify songs by pointing a smartphone at the audio source. The European Commission said it was concerned about Apple's access to data on Shazam's users who use competing music streaming services in Europe.

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The first major 'PUBG' tournament takes place in Berlin this summer - 23 Apr 2018 at 2:08pm - Player Unknown Battlegrounds, aka PUBG, has been pushing its way to the eSports realm for quite some time now. While it has moved beyond the straight-up battle royale genre it popularized with new gameplay like War Mode, it's the behind the scenes te...

Hacking a Satellite is Surprisingly Easy - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:50pm - Caroline Haskins, writing for The Outline: Hundreds of multi-ton liabilities -- soaring faster than the speed of sound, miles above the surface of the earth -- are operating on Windows-95. They're satellites, responsible for everything from GPS positioning, to taking weather measurements, to carrying cell signals, to providing television and internet. For the countries that own these satellites, they're invaluable resources. Even though they're old, it's more expensive to take satellites down than it is to just leave them up. So they stay up. Unfortunately, these outdated systems makes old satellites prime targets for cyber attacks. [...] A malicious actor could fake their IP address, which gives information about a user's computer and its location. This person could then get access to the satellite's computer system, and manipulate where the satellite goes or what it does. Alternatively, an actor could jam the satellite's radio transmissions with earth, essentially disabling it. The cost of such an attack could be huge. If a satellite doesn't work, life-saving GPS or online information could be withheld to people on earth when they need it most. What's worse, if part of a satellite -- or an entire satellite -- is knocked out of its orbit from an attack, the debris could create a domino effect and cause extreme damage to other satellites.

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CBS All Access and its exclusive shows are now available in Canada - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:47pm - CBS' subscription on-demand streaming service is now available in Canada. It's the first launch of CBS All Access outside of the US and it will give Canadian residents access to new episodes of current shows seven days after they air, past seasons of...

Uber drivers will no longer see exact location history for riders - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:31pm - Uber has been improving both driver and passenger safety with new features -- or, in its latest move, by modifying existing settings. As part of a new pilot program, the company will soon start obscuring the log of rider pickup and drop-off locations...

Johns Hopkins performs the first total penis and scrotum transplant - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:11pm - The first US penis transplant was successfully performed in 2016. Last year, a uterus transplant recipient gave birth for the first time in the US, too. Now, doctors at Johns Hopkins University have successfully transplanted an entire penis and scrot...

MIT Researchers Developed a 'System For Dream Control' - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:00pm - dmoberhaus writes: Researchers at MIT Media Lab have adapted a centuries' old technique for inducing hypnagogia for the 21st century. Known as Dormio, this system is able to extend and manipulate the period users spend in a transitional state of consciousness between wakefulness and sleep known as hypnagogia. This state is characterized by vivid hallucinations and microdreams, and as the MIT researchers demonstrated, the contents of these microdreams can be manipulated with the system and subsequently result in heightened creativity when the user awakes. Motherboard got the exclusive details on the system.

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EU launches anti-trust investigation into Apple?s purchase of Shazam - 23 Apr 2018 at 12:47pm - Late last year, Apple announced that it would be acquiring Shazam. Due to the size of the deal, Apple didn't have to get clearance from the European Commission (EC) itself, as it would have had to do if the proposed acquisition had been larger. But i...

Court blocks Trump's delay of fuel efficiency penalties - 23 Apr 2018 at 12:27pm - The Trump administration's efforts to undo car efficiency guidelines just hit a major obstacle. A federal court has blocked a White House attempt to delay the implementation of a rule toughening penalties for automakers that don't meet national fuel...

Amazon Has a Top-Secret Plan to Build Home Robots - 23 Apr 2018 at 12:15pm - After making smart speakers a household product (at least to some), Amazon seems to have found its next big consumer product: robots. Amazon is building smart robots that are equipped with cameras that let them drive around homes, Bloomberg reported Monday. These robots could launch as soon as next year. From the report: Codenamed "Vesta," after the Roman goddess of the hearth, home and family, the project is overseen by Gregg Zehr, who runs Amazon's Lab126 hardware research and development division based in Sunnyvale, California. Lab126 is responsible for Amazon devices such as the Echo speakers, Fire TV set-top-boxes, Fire tablets and the ill-fated Fire Phone. The Vesta project originated a few years ago, but this year Amazon began to aggressively ramp up hiring. There are dozens of listings on the Lab 126 Jobs page for openings like "Software Engineer, Robotics" and "Principle Sensors Engineer." People briefed on the plan say the company hopes to begin seeding the robots in employees' homes by the end of this year, and potentially with consumers as early as 2019, though the timeline could change, and Amazon hardware projects are sometimes killed during gestation.

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Why is a celebrity personal finance guru suing Facebook? - 23 Apr 2018 at 12:00pm - Martin Lewis is a British journalist, TV presenter and Ralph Nader-esque campaigner who has announced that he will sue Facebook for defamation. The consumer champion has seen his face co-opted by nefarious types who use his name (and brand) to sell c...

Deezer now creates weekly playlists based on your listening habits - 23 Apr 2018 at 11:48am - Not to be left behind by the competition, Deezer is tweaking its Flow feature. The app's latest update augments the automatically curated playlist tool to include tracks from artists related to what you're listening to. More than that, the patch give...

The Last Known Person Born in the 19th Century Dies in Japan at 117 - 23 Apr 2018 at 11:35am - Jason Kottke: As of 2015, only two women born in the 1800s and two others born in 1900 (the last year of the 19th century) were still alive. In the next two years, three of those women passed away, including Jamaican Violet Brown, the last living subject of Queen Victoria, who reigned over the British Empire starting in 1837. Last week Nabi Tajima, the last known survivor of the 19th century, died in Japan at age 117.

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Google Assistant's routines are an easy way to automate your home - 23 Apr 2018 at 11:30am - Since Amazon's Echo arrived in late 2014, voice assistants have become increasingly important in making sense of the disparate smart home devices like speakers, light bulbs, thermostats, security cameras and more. But in the last few months, Alexa an...

Facebook explains what advertisers know about you - 23 Apr 2018 at 11:19am - Facebook is still facing heat over its privacy controls in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and it's trying to reassure users that their personal info isn't on the open market. The social network has posted a detailed Q&A explaining...

'Super Mario 64: Ocarina of Time? is the perfect Nintendo mashup - 23 Apr 2018 at 11:00am - Super Mario 64 is considered to be one of the greatest video games of all time. Its large, imaginative levels and increasingly difficult challenges have defined the 3D platformer genre since its release on the Nintendo 64. Similarly, The Legend of Ze...

The Music Industry Had a Fantastic 2017, Driven by Streaming Revenues - 23 Apr 2018 at 10:54am - An anonymous reader shares a report: Global recorded music revenues soared by $1.4 billion in 2017 largely due to the increased adoption of music streaming services among consumers, reports the Music Industry Blog. Global recorded music revenues reached $17.4 billion in 2017, putting it just a hair below 2008's $17.7 billion in revenues. That means that most of the decline in recorded music revenues over the past 10 years has now been reversed. Streaming was the largest driver of that growth, accounting for 43% of all revenues. In 2017 streaming revenues surged by 39%, topping out at $7.4 billion.

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Huawei P20 Pro review: The best phone you'll never buy - 23 Apr 2018 at 10:30am - For the past few months, Huawei has been making headlines for all the wrong reasons — the US government warned against buying the company's phones, which led to the breakdown of near-final deals with AT&T and Verizon. Then Best Buy,...

Microsoft Developers Hid a Secret Puzzle in Windows Backgrounds as They Knew ... - 23 Apr 2018 at 10:10am - An anonymous reader shares a report: Microsoft developers working on Windows 8 created a puzzle and embedded it in the wallpapers used for internal builds of the operating system. The team knew that the images would leak out to the public -- and probably the internal builds of Windows -- so they decided to have some fun with it. Over the course of numerous builds, the puzzle was developed -- but only one person ever solved it! Over the weekend, Jensen Harris -- a former group program manager of Microsoft Office and Microsoft director leading the team working on the redesign of Windows 8 -- took to Twitter to come clean about the secret puzzle. He explained that it was common for internal test builds of Windows to have wallpapers that were not intended for public release, but said that messages tended to be included to discourage leaking: "Traditionally, these wallpapers included text embedded in them threatening to throw people in jail if they leaked the build, blah blah, substantial penalty for early withdrawal, not all coins go up in value (some go down!), etc. etc. We wanted to try a more elegant tact. So early in Windows 8, we created a wallpaper that was a combination of the text the lawyers wanted us to use with an attempt to appeal to people's better nature...thus the "shhh... let's not leak our hard work" series of wallpapers was born."

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Samsung is making six TV series just for VR - 23 Apr 2018 at 10:00am - With all the immersive games, films and documentaries available, there are plenty of interesting VR experiences for your headset. Samsung wants to make sure you'll never run out, announcing today its "Pilot Season." It's a "new initiative aimed at in...

Scientists grow human brain tissue in mice - 23 Apr 2018 at 9:37am - Brain "organoids" made from stem cells are a promising way to study the brain, but the longest they've survived in a petri dish is just five weeks. Researchers from the Salk Institute recently implanted a bean-sized brain organoid into a mouse, and c...

The best lightweight gaming laptops - 23 Apr 2018 at 9:00am - Back at CES a few months ago, I wrote that we were entering a golden age in lightweight gaming laptops. It started last year with NVIDIA's small, power-efficient Max-Q graphics, followed by Intel and AMD's surprising team-up on Core H with Radeon RX...

Bloomberg: Amazon wants to build a home robot - 23 Apr 2018 at 8:40am - Bloomberg is claiming that Amazon is looking to build a home robot that would do for personal androids what the Kindle did to reading. The website's sources-in-the-know claim that the giant's hardware division, Lab126, is working on some sort of dome...

Are Widescreen Laptops Dumb? - 23 Apr 2018 at 8:12am - "After years of phones, laptops, tablets, and TV screens converging on 16:9 as the 'right' display shape -- allowing video playback without distracting black bars -- smartphones have disturbed the universality recently by moving to even more elongated formats like 18:9, 19:9, or even 19.5:9 in the iPhone X's case," writes Amelia Holowaty Krales via The Verge. "That's prompted me to consider where else the default widescreen proportions might be a poor fit, and I've realized that laptops are the worst offenders." Krales makes the case for why a 16:9 screen of 13 to 15 inches in size is a poor fit: Practically every interface in Apple's macOS, Microsoft's Windows, and on the web is designed by stacking user controls in a vertical hierarchy. At the top of every MacBook, there's a menu bar. At the bottom, by default, is the Dock for launching your most-used apps. On Windows, you have the taskbar serving a similar purpose -- and though it may be moved around the screen like Apple's Dock, it's most commonly kept as a sliver traversing the bottom of the display. Every window in these operating systems has chrome -- the extra buttons and indicator bars that allow you to close, reshape, or move a window around -- and the components of that chrome are usually attached at the top and bottom. Look at your favorite website (hopefully this one) on the internet, and you'll again see a vertical structure. As if all that wasn't enough, there's also the matter of tabs. Tabs are a couple of decades old now, and, like much of the rest of the desktop and web environment, they were initially thought up in an age where the predominant computer displays were close to square with a 4:3 aspect ratio. That's to say, most computer screens were the shape of an iPad when many of today's most common interface and design elements were being developed. As much of a chrome minimalist as I try to be, I still can't extricate myself from needing a menu bar in my OS and tab and address bars inside my browser. I'm still learning to live without a bookmarks bar. With all of these horizontal bars invading our vertical space, a 16:9 screen quickly starts to feel cramped, especially at the typical laptop size. You wind up spending more time scrolling through content than engaging with it. What is your preferred aspect ratio for a laptop? Do you prefer Microsoft and Google's machines that have a squarer 3:2 aspect ratio, or Apple's MacBook Pro that has a 16:10 display?

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The Morning After: Faster rockets, the quiet end of Apple Watch stores - 23 Apr 2018 at 6:44am - Hey, good morning! Welcome to the new week! Amazon, Netflix and others are taking on another subscription service over piracy, the next Doom movie will probably be on one of those (legal) services and we touch on some of the more interesting project...

ASUS made a sub-$200 smartphone to fight Xiaomi in India - 23 Apr 2018 at 6:15am - Having surpassed the US to become the second largest smartphone market after China, India is now the latest battleground for some of the top mobile brands. According to Canalys, even Samsung lost its top position there to Xiaomi as of Q4 2017, follow...

Report reveals the extent of China's tech sexism problem - 23 Apr 2018 at 5:37am - Chinese tech companies like Baidu and Alibaba have been using blatant sexism to attract job candidates and advertising jobs for "men only," Human Rights Watch (HRW) has reported. "Major companies like Alibaba have published recruitment ads promising...

Smart glasses could stream video without killing your battery - 23 Apr 2018 at 3:37am - There a number of reasons why camera-equipped smart glasses haven't taken off, whether it's dorky designs, bans or just a lack of practical applications beyond niche audiences. However, there's a common theme for them all: they need big batteries to...

Net Neutrality Is Over Monday, But Experts Say ISPs Will Wait To Screw Us - 23 Apr 2018 at 3:07am - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Inverse: Parts of the Federal Communication Commission's repeal of net neutrality is slated to take effect on April 23, causing worry among internet users who fear the worst from their internet service providers. However, many experts believe there won't be immediate changes come Monday, but that ISPs will wait until users aren't paying attention to make their move. "Don't expect any changes right out of the gate," Dary Merckens, CTO of Gunner Technology, tells Inverse. Merckens specializes in JavaScript development for government and business, and sees why ISPs would want to lay low for a while before enacting real changes. "It would be a PR nightmare for ISPs if they introduced sweeping changes immediately after the repeal of net neutrality," he says. While parts of the FCC's new plan will go into effect on Monday, the majority of the order still doesn't have a date for when it will be official. Specific rules that modify data collection requirements still have to be approved by the Office of Management and Budget, and the earliest that can happen is on April 27. Tech experts and consumer policy advocates don't expect changes to happen right away, as ISPs will likely avoid any large-scale changes in order to convince policymakers that the net neutrality repeal was no big deal after all.

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Iran bans banks from trading cryptocurrencies - 23 Apr 2018 at 1:24am - Iran is borrowing a page from China when it comes to regulating money: if your real-world currency is in trouble, crack down on the virtual kind. The country's central bank has banned other banks and financial institutions from buying, selling or pr...

Who Has More of Your Personal Data Than Facebook? Try Google - 22 Apr 2018 at 11:33pm - Facebook may be in the hot seat right now for its collection of personal data without our knowledge or explicit consent, but as The Wall Street Journal points out, "Google is a far bigger threat by many measures: the volume of information it gathers, the reach of its tracking and the time people spend on its sites and apps." From the report (alternative source): It's likely that Google has shadow profiles (data the company gathers on people without accounts) on as at least as many people as Facebook does, says Chandler Givens, CEO of TrackOff, which develops software to fight identity theft. Google allows everyone, whether they have a Google account or not, to opt out of its ad targeting, though, like Facebook, it continues to gather your data. Google Analytics is far and away the web's most dominant analytics platform. Used on the sites of about half of the biggest companies in the U.S., it has a total reach of 30 million to 50 million sites. Google Analytics tracks you whether or not you are logged in. Meanwhile, the billion-plus people who have Google accounts are tracked in even more ways. In 2016, Google changed its terms of service, allowing it to merge its massive trove of tracking and advertising data with the personally identifiable information from our Google accounts. Google uses, among other things, our browsing and search history, apps we've installed, demographics like age and gender and, from its own analytics and other sources, where we've shopped in the real world. Google says it doesn't use information from "sensitive categories" such as race, religion, sexual orientation or health. Because it relies on cross-device tracking, it can spot logged-in users no matter which device they're on. Google fuels even more data harvesting through its dominant ad marketplaces. There are up to 4,000 data brokers in the U.S., and collectively they know everything about us we might otherwise prefer they didn't -- whether we're pregnant, divorced or trying to lose weight. Google works with some of these brokers directly but the company says it vets them to prevent targeting based on sensitive information. Google also is the biggest enabler of data harvesting, through the world's two billion active Android mobile devices.

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Mt. Gox chief returns as an exec at a VPN giant - 22 Apr 2018 at 11:11pm - Former Mt. Gox CEO Mark Karpeles may still be on trial for embezzlement in Japan, but that isn't stopping him from playing an influential role in the cryptocurrency world. As part of an interview with Fortune, the one-time bitcoin exchange leader has...

Amazon, Netflix and studios sue subscription service over piracy - 22 Apr 2018 at 9:32pm - Hollywood studios usually fight piracy by chasing after software add-ons and free streaming services, with the occasional device thrown in. A paid service, however? That's relatively rare... or at least, it has been. Amazon, Netflix and multipl...

'Drupalgeddon2' Touches Off Arms Race To Mass-Exploit Powerful Web Servers - 22 Apr 2018 at 9:11pm - Researchers with Netlab 360 warn that attackers are mass-exploiting "Drupalgeddon2," the name of an extremely critical vulnerability Drupal maintainers patched in late March. The exploit allows them to take control of powerful website servers. Ars Technica reports: Formally indexed as CVE- 2018-7600, Drupalgeddon2 makes it easy for anyone on the Internet to take complete control of vulnerable servers simply by accessing a URL and injecting publicly available exploit code. Exploits allow attackers to run code of their choice without having to have an account of any type on a vulnerable website. The remote-code vulnerability harkens back to a 2014 Drupal vulnerability that also made it easy to commandeer vulnerable servers. Drupalgeddon2 "is under active attack, and every Drupal site behind our network is being probed constantly from multiple IP addresses," Daniel Cid, CTO and founder of security firm Sucuri, told Ars. "Anyone that has not patched is hacked already at this point. Since the first public exploit was released, we are seeing this arms race between the criminals as they all try to hack as many sites as they can." China-based Netlab 360, meanwhile, said at least three competing attack groups are exploiting the vulnerability. The most active group, Netlab 360 researchers said in a blog post published Friday, is using it to install multiple malicious payloads, including cryptocurrency miners and software for performing distributed denial-of-service attacks on other domains. The group, dubbed Muhstik after a keyword that pops up in its code, relies on 11 separate command-and-control domains and IP addresses, presumably for redundancy in the event one gets taken down.

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UK Teen Who Hacked CIA Director Sentenced To 2 Years In Prison - 22 Apr 2018 at 7:13pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: A British teenager who gained notoriety for hacking a number of high profile United States government employees including former CIA director John Brennan and former director of intelligence James Clapper was sentenced Friday to two years in prison. Eighteen-year-old Kane Gamble pleaded guilty to 10 separate charges, including eight counts of "performing a function with intent to secure unauthorized access" and two counts of "unauthorized modification of computer material," the Guardian reported. Gamble, otherwise known by his online alias Cracka, was 15 at the time that he started his hacking campaigns. The alleged leader of a hacking group known as Crackas With Attitude (CWA), Gamble made it a point to target members of the U.S. government. The young hacker's group managed to successfully gain access to ex-CIA director John Brennan's AOL email account. The group hacked a number of accounts belonging to former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, including his personal email, his wife's email, and his phone and internet provider account. The hackers allegedly made it so every call to Clapper's home phone would get forwarded to the Free Palestine Movement.

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Tesla Batteries Retain Over 90 Percent Charging Power After 160,000 Miles, Su... - 22 Apr 2018 at 6:12pm - According to a survey of over 350 Tesla owners, Tesla batteries retain over 90 percent of their charging power after 160,000 miles. The EVs dropped only 5 percent of their capacity after 50,000 miles, but lose it at a much slower rate after that. Most Tesla vehicles will have over 90 percent of their charging power after around 185,000 miles, and 80 percent capacity after 500,000. Engadget reports: Tesla has no battery degradation warranty on its Model S and X luxury EVs, but guarantees that the Model 3 will retain 70 percent battery capacity after 120,000 miles (long-range battery) and 100,000 miles (shorter-range battery). That's a bit more generous than the one Nissan offers on the Leaf (66 percent over 100,000 miles) for instance. According to the survey data, Tesla will easily be able to meet this mark.

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Pornhub Hasn't Been Actively Enforcing Its Deepfake Ban - 22 Apr 2018 at 5:11pm - Pornhub said in February that it was banning AI-generated deepfake videos, but BuzzFeed News found that it's not doing a very good job at enforcing that policy. The media company found more than 70 deepfake videos -- depicting graphic fake sex scenes with Emma Watson, Scarlett Johanson, and other celebrities -- were easily searchable from the site's homepage using the search term "deepfake." From the report: Shortly after the ban in February, Mashable reported that there were dozens of deepfake videos still on the site. Pornhub removed those videos after the report, but a few months later, BuzzFeed News easily found more than 70 deepfake videos using the search term "deepfake" on the site's homepage. Nearly all the videos -- which included graphic and fake depictions of celebrities like Katy Perry, Scarlett Johansson, Daisy Ridley, and Jennifer Lawrence -- had the word "deepfake" prominently mentioned in the title of the video and many of the names of the videos' uploaders contained the word "deepfake." Similarly, a search for "fake deep" returned over 30 of the nonconsensual celebrity videos. Most of the videos surfaced by BuzzFeed News had view counts in the hundreds of thousands -- one video featuring the face of actor Emma Watson garnered over 1 million views. Some accounts posting deepfake videos appeared to have been active for as long as two months and have racked up over 3 million video views. "Content that is flagged on Pornhub that directly violates our Terms of Service is removed as soon as we are made aware of it; this includes non-consensual content," Pornhub said in a statement. "To further ensure the safety of all our fans, we officially took a hard stance against revenge porn, which we believe is a form of sexual assault, and introduced a submission form for the easy removal of non-consensual content." The company also provided a link where users can report any "material that is distributed without the consent of the individuals involved."

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Google's AR Microscope Quickly Highlights Cancer Cells - 22 Apr 2018 at 4:10pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from UploadVR: Google Research this week revealed an AR microscope (ARM) capable of detecting cancerous cells in real-time with the help of machine learning. Locating cancer with a standard microscope is a difficult and time-consuming process, with a raft of information for doctors to study and investigate. With this new solution, though, the microscope is able to quickly locate cancerous cells and then highlight them as a doctor peers inside. The platform uses a modified light microscope integrated with image analysis and machine learning algorithms into its field of view. An AR display sits above a camera that communicates with the algorithm to display data as soon as it locates an issue. In order words, the microscope immediately begins looking for cancerous cells as soon as you place a sample beneath it. It's effectively doing the same job as a doctor just, according to Google, a lot faster. Google posted a video about the AR microscope on YouTube.

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Instagram Won't Stop Showing Me the Mother's Day Photos I Don't Want to See - 19 May 2017 at 3:45pm -

After four and a half years of not speaking to my mom I?ve learned to stay away from social media on Mother?s Day.

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'World?s Hottest Pepper' Will Have You Breathing Fire, But It Won?t Kill You - 19 May 2017 at 3:40pm -

Not all hot peppers are created equal, and few are as unequal as the Dragon?s Breath chili?a new breed that may soon find itself atop the ?world?s hottest? throne. Forged by Wales horticulturalist Mike Smith, the red-orange, fingernail-sized fruit is the unintentional product of a trial of a new performance-boosting?

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Federal Agents Are Now Using ?Stingrays? to Track and Capture Undocumented Im... - 19 May 2017 at 3:11pm -

Controversial cellphone tracking technology is being deployed as a tool in President Donald Trump?s expanding effort to arrest and deport illegal US residents.

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A 'Superbug' Fungus Is Spreading Across the US - 19 May 2017 at 2:13pm -

Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from 7 to more than 122. What?s more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday.

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All the Dangerous Things You Shouldn't Be Doing With Your Fidget Spinners - 19 May 2017 at 2:09pm -

Like lawn darts, nano-magnets, and slap bracelets, fidget spinners are only one stupid stunt away from becoming yet another forgotten fad. And as usual, instead of enjoying them responsibly, the internet is hard at work trying to find ways to make spinners as dangerous as playing with firecrackers. This is why we?

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The Venom Movie Has Chosen Its Star/Symbiote Host: Tom Hardy - 19 May 2017 at 2:05pm -

Variety is reporting that Tom Hardy, who played Bane in Christopher Nolan?s The Dark Knight Rises, will next play another iconic comic book villain, Venom. The frequent Spider-Man villain is getting his own film next year, which will be directed by Ruben Fleischer, who made Zombieland.

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This Cyclops Goat Is Good - 19 May 2017 at 1:45pm -

Eight days ago, a one-eyed goat was born in the Indian state of Assam. Since then, this brave little fluff has become an international sensation for obvious reasons: clearly, it?s training to be in the X-Men.

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Inside The Russian Bomber That?s Been Flying America?s Coastline - 19 May 2017 at 1:22pm -

The Russian Tu-95/-142 Bear has been showing up in a lot of places it maybe shouldn?t be over the past month, as the Russian Air Force and Navy continues to probe the air defenses of several nations.The sixty-year-old symbol of the Cold War has been able to remain a viable weapon system despite its age, much the way?

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This Is How Miserable IBM Voice Recognition Probably Was in the '80s - 19 May 2017 at 1:13pm -

In the age of Siri, we take for granted how far speech recognition technology has come. But a quick glance back at 1986, when IBM introduced its voice recognition software, shows that we?ve travelled light years since the earliest version of this game-changing software. And it?s even more fun in satire form.

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Automate An Outlet With TP-Link's Alexa-Compatible Smart Plug, Now Just $21 - 19 May 2017 at 12:50pm -

Like the idea of a Belkin WeMo Switch, but not willing to spend $40-$50 to try one out? This TP-Link alternative has a nearly identical feature set for half the price.

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Flat Earthers Won't Believe This News on Antarctica?s Climate - 19 May 2017 at 12:39pm -

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we?re overlooking a basic reality of geometry.

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I'm Afraid to Ask The Internet to Name This New Moon - 19 May 2017 at 12:10pm -

Good news! Three space telescopes, including Hubble, have combined their celestial powers to spot a moon orbiting a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt ?the region beyond Neptune where Pluto and countless other icy bodies live. According to NASA, the dwarf planet?s moon has lots to teach scientists about how moons formed?

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Rudy Giuliani Forgot 9/11('s Effect on Commercial Air Travel) - 19 May 2017 at 11:30am -

Yesterday morning, Rudy Giuliani?America?s mayor, Donald Trump?s current cybersecurity advisor, and a race-baiting thug most famous for being circumstantially tied to a great tragedy?had a little dust-up with the TSA while making his way through Newark airport. Apparently, the former mayor who famously saw his city?

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Google's Coolest Tech Is Getting Harder and Harder to See - 19 May 2017 at 11:25am -

Google always uses its annual I/O developer conference as a place to trot out some of its biggest and most exciting product updates. You?d be forgiven for feeling like this year was kind of a dud. There were no new gadgets, no new moonshot projects, and not even cool new swag like Google Cardboard headsets. The?

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The First AI-Generated Paint Names Include 'Homestar Brown' and 'Stanky Bean' - 19 May 2017 at 11:20am -

Humans aren?t nearly as creative as we think. Craft brewers, for example, have run out of fun names and are sending each other cease and desist letters for coming up with the same ideas. So, what if we let computers come up with new names for us?

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Duck Me, Ducktales Has Added Lin-Manuel Miranda as Gizmoduck - 19 May 2017 at 11:14am -

Man, the cast for the new DuckTales cartoon was already pretty insane. And now it just got even better.

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'Panda' Porpoise Could Be Extinct In Months - 19 May 2017 at 11:10am -

Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one. These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world? the Northern Gulf of California. Their nickname?the ?panda? porpoise?comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of?

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Sad, Sick Idiot Anthony Weiner to Plead Guilty to Sexting 15-Year-Old Girl - 19 May 2017 at 11:03am -

Early Friday morning, former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner surrendered himself to FBI agents and will appear before a federal judge later this afternoon. There, he will plead guilty to transferring obscene material to a minor, multiple news outlets report.

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Uber Threatens to Dump Engineer Accused of Stealing Trade Secrets From Waymo - 19 May 2017 at 10:50am -

Lots of people get fired from Uber. One employee was reportedly fired last year for helping his female coworkers raise complaints about sexual harassment. Drivers get deactivated from the platform if their ratings slip below a certain number (Uber says the minimum rating varies by city, but driver forums say dipping?

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Today's Best Deals: Under Armour Apparel, Kamado Grill, SoundBuds, and More - 19 May 2017 at 10:28am -

Anker?s newest SoundBuds, a Big Green Egg alternative, and a huge Under Armour apparel sale lead off Friday?s best deals from around the web.

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