all-news.org
TECHNO


NASA's Curiosity Rover Recovers From Glitch on Mars - 25 Jan 2020 at 3:34pm - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity "lost its orientation...partway through its last set of activities," reported a planetary geologist on the rover's team Monday. Curiosity had lost track of its position in space and the position of its various parts like its robotic arm. "Thus, Curiosity stopped moving, freezing in place until its knowledge of its orientation can be recovered. Curiosity kept sending us information, so we know what happened and can develop a recovery plan...." Space.com now shares the rest of the story: "We learned this morning that plan was successful and Curiosity was ready for science once more!" mission team member Scott Guzewich, an atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, wrote in another update on Tuesday. This latest recovery shouldn't come as a shock; Curiosity has overcome numerous setbacks since landing inside Mars' 96-mile-wide (154 kilometers) Gale Crater in August 2012. The rover has had issues with its memory and its wheels, for example, but has always bounced back... Curiosity is now climbing the foothills of Mount Sharp, the 3.4-mile-high (5.5 km) mountain that rises from Gale Crater's center. The rover is reading the rocks for clues about Mars' long-ago climate transition, which turned the Red Planet from a relatively warm and wet place to the cold desert world it is today. CNET notes that Curiosity is currently NASA's only working rover on Mars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Alan Turing's Doctorate & Knighthood Medal Recovered 36 Years After Theft - 25 Jan 2020 at 2:34pm - Slashdot reader McGruber shares the news that several of Alan Turing's historic personal effects have been recovered nearly 36 years after they were stolen. From a report: In filings in the U.S. District Court of Colorado Friday, federal officials say they seized the British mathematician's Princeton University degree, his Order of the British Empire medal and several photos, school reports and letters from his time at Sherborne School, a boarding school in Dorset, England. According to the seizure notices, a woman named Julia Turing approached the University of Colorado Boulder in January 2018, saying she wanted to loan Alan Turing's memorabilia to the library. Archivists at the library determined that the items were stolen from Sherborne in 1984... Julia Turing isn't related to Alan Turing, but she changed her last name from Schwinghamer in 1988, according to the complaint... A month after she reached out to the University of Colorado Boulder, federal officials searched Julia Turing's home in Conifer and recovered the items. The Guardian shared this quote from a member of the government committee that decided Turing should appear on the U.K.'s new £50 note. "[He was] the father of computer science, a significant influence on the modern field of artificial intelligence and most importantly, his work at Bletchley Park during the second world war led a team of code-breakers to crack the German Enigma code."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



New Trailer, Gameplay Videos Released For Upcoming 'DOOM Eternal' - 25 Jan 2020 at 1:34pm - Id software has released a new trailer for their upcoming Doom sequel set on a demon-infested planet Earth in the year 2151. And GameSpot has uploaded a 10-minute clip of gameplay while Collider released 15 minutes. Collider writes: Doom Eternal takes everything that was gloriously batshit about Doom 2016, throws it in a Lamborghini full of Slayer albums and catapults it into the sun. This game is out of its goddamn mind in the best possible way, and I literally cannot wait to get my hands on the full version... The Fortress of Doom is massive. I wasn't able to access every area, and could only guess at the function of some of the areas I did see. One section had the original Doom Marine costume on display in a glass case, and the game's director, Hugo Martin confirmed that the skin is an unlockable. Moreover, he indicated that there are several unlockable player skins in the game, including one he was clearly excited about but couldn't reveal, saying that it was still in the licensing approval stage... Doom Eternal, like its predecessor, is a fast game, pitting you against hordes of powerful enemies that force you to constantly be on the move and quick-swapping weapons to inflict maximum damage while avoiding death. You have a few tools at your disposal to earn guaranteed life, ammo, and armor, which are the over-the-top glory kills, the terrifying chainsaw, and the brand-new flame belcher respectively. Glory kills are special instant-death maneuvers you can unleash on enemies after staggering them, and the addition of a retractable arm blade has heightened the graphic absurdity of them to such a degree that I was giggling like an idiot every time I pulled one off. I spent the next three hours murdering my way across three massive levels that were incredibly varied in terms of design, beginning in a blasted post-apocalyptic city, then moving to a vast overgrown temple, and finally ending up in a heavily-fortified arctic base... Each stage had a completely different feel -- the city was very ground-based, with dark subway tunnels and skeletal office buildings. The temple was spread out across what felt like miles, with an unexpected amount of verticality and traversal thanks to the new climbing mechanic. Yep, Doom Guy can now cling to certain walls, as well as swing from poles to extend his jump and gain access to distant ledges. The climbing controls are a bit funky, like Spider-Man with a rotator cuff injury, but the traversal puzzles are fun and satisfying, and allow for some truly massive environments... Martin promised that players will continue to be introduced to new enemies and environments right up until the end of the 22+ hour campaign. He describes Doom Eternal as a thinking person's action game, and that the team's goal was to create a combat puzzle worth your time. DOOM Eternal is scheduled to be released on March 20th.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Framework Developer 'Ragequits' Open Source Community, Citing Negative Commen... - 25 Jan 2020 at 12:34pm - The maintainer of the popular Rust web framework Actix has quit the project -- though he's backed off threats to make its code private and delete its repository, instead appointing a new maintainer. "Be a maintainer of large open source project is not a fun task," he'd complained last week on GitHub. "You alway face with rude and hate, everyone knows better how to build software, nobody wants to do home work and read docs and think a bit and very few provide any help... "You felt betrayed after you put so much effort and then to hear all this shit comments, even if you understand that that is usual internet behavior.... Nowadays supporting actix project is not fun, and be[ing] part of rust community is not fun as well." The Register reports: Actix Web was developed by Nikolay Kim, who is also a senior software engineer at Microsoft, though the Actix project is not an official Microsoft project. Actix Web is based on Actix, a framework for Rust based on the Actor model, also developed by Kim. The web framework is important to the Rust community partly because it addresses a common use case (development web applications) and partly because of its outstanding performance. For some tests, Actix tops the Techempower benchmarks. The project is open source and while it is popular, there has been some unhappiness among users about its use of "unsafe" code... Safe code is protected from common bugs (and more importantly, security vulnerabilities) arising from issues like variables which point to uninitialized memory, or variables which are used after the memory allocated to them has been freed, or attempting to write data to a variable which exceeds the memory allocated. Code in Rust is safe by default, but the language also supports unsafe code, which can be useful for interoperability or to improve performance. There is extensive use of unsafe code in Actix, leading to debate about what should be fixed. Kim was not always receptive to proposed changes... Kim said that he did not ignore or delete issues arbitrarily, but only because he felt he had a better or more creative solution than the one proposed -- while also acknowledging that the "removing issue was a stupid idea." He also threatened to "make [Actix] repos private and then delete them...." Since then, matters have improved. The Github repository was restored and Kim said, "I realized, a lot of people depend on actix. And it would be unfair to just delete repos... I hope new community of developers emerge. And good luck!" The developer news site DevClass wrote that "The apparent 'ragequit' has prompted questions about the dynamics within the open source community." Over 120 GitHub users have now signed a sympathetic letter to Nikolay from "users, contributors, and followers of your work in the Rust community," saying "We are extremely disappointed at the level of abuse directed towards you." "Working on open source projects should be rewarding, and your work has empowered thousands of developers across the world to build web services with Rust. It's incredibly tragic for someone who has contributed so much to the community, to be made to feel so unwelcome that they feel that they have no other choice than to leave. This is not the kind of community we want."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Did America Steal Its Space Force Logo From 'Star Trek'? - 25 Jan 2020 at 11:34am - On Friday America's commander-in-chief revealed the logo for the newest branch of its military, Space Force. CNBC immediately reported that the logo "has boldly gone where Star Trek has gone before." The Pentagon and White House did not immediately respond to CNBC's query as to why the Space Force and Star Trek logos -- both with blue globes, white stars, and swooshed rings around a sleek space ship -- looked similar. "The U.S. government took a thing from a TV show and made it the official emblem of a branch of the military, " tweeted a culture writer for the New York Times. But conservative national security commentator John Noonan argued it looks more like the logo for America's Air Force Space Command (founded in 1982). "So the Air Force originally stole the Star Trek logo?" someone asked him on Twitter -- prompting this wry reply. "Well, that was certainly the joke we made 15 years ago." But it may actually be the other way around. One Star Trek fan site claims that the Starfleet logo never even appeared on the original Star Trek or Star Trek: The Next Generation series, and wasn't created until after the Air Force's logo, during the fourth season of Deep Space Nine (around 1996), by American graphic designer Mike Okuda: In the Star Trek Sticker Book, on the cover of which the logo of Starfleet Command is shown at a large size, Mike Okuda writes, "The Starfleet Command seal was first seen in 'Homefront' (Deep Space 9) and later in 'In the Flesh' (Voyager), although the agency itself, of course, dates back to the original Star Trek series. "The symbol was intended to be somewhat reminiscent of the NASA emblem."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



EFF Defends Bruce Perens Victory Against 'Open Source Security' in Appeals Court - 25 Jan 2020 at 10:34am - Bruce Perens (Slashdot reader #3872) co-founded the Open Source Initiative with Eric Raymond in 1998. (And then left it this January 2nd.) But in 2017 Perens was also sued partly over comments made in a Slashdot discussion. He's just shared a video from the 9th Circuit Appeals Court hearing -- along with this update: Open Source Security Inc. and their CEO, Mr. Bradley Spengler, sued me for 3 Million dollars for defamation, because I wrote this blog post, in which I explained why I thought they were in violation of the GPL. They lost in the lower court, and had to file this $300,000 bond to pay for my defense, which will be awarded to my attorneys if the appeals court upholds the lower court's finding. Because OSS/Spengler are in Pensylvania and I am in California, this was tried before a Magistrate in Federal court, with the laws of California and the evidentiary rules of the Federal Court. Thus, I am now in the 9th Circuit for appeal. The first attorney to appear is for OSS/Spengler. The second works for EFF, and the third for O'Melveny. In my opinion EFF and O'Melveny did a great job. If you are interested in the case, I have a partial archive of the case documents from PACER, and a link to PACER where the rest can be found, here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



A Man Diagnosed With Wuhan Coronavirus Near Seattle Is Being Treated Largely ... - 25 Jan 2020 at 8:00am - An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNN: The first person diagnosed with the Wuhan coronavirus in the United States is being treated by a few medical workers and a robot. The robot, equipped with a stethoscope, is helping doctors take the man's vitals and communicate with him through a large screen, said Dr. George Diaz, chief of the infectious disease division at the Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. "The nursing staff in the room move the robot around so we can see the patient in the screen, talk to him," Diaz said, adding the use of the robot minimizes exposure of medical staff to the infected man. It's unclear when the patient will be released because the CDC, which is set to provide the discharge details, has recommended additional testing. "They're looking for ongoing presence of the virus," Diaz told CNN on Thursday. "They're looking to see when the patient is no longer contagious."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Clayton Christensen, Father of 'Disruptive Innovation,' Dies At 67 - 25 Jan 2020 at 5:00am - Clayton Christensen, the business scholar who coined the term "disruptive innovation," died of cancer treatment complications on Thursday at age 67. The Verge reports: You may not immediately recognize his name, but the tech industry -- and every resulting industry -- is built on the framework of technology disruption and innovation that Christensen devised. The crux of Christensen's theory is that big, successful companies that neglect potential customers at the lower end of their markets (mainframe computers, in his famous example) are ripe for disruption from smaller, more efficient, more nimble competitors that can do almost as good a job more cheaply (like personal computers). One need look no further than the biggest names in Silicon Valley to find evidence of successful disrupters, from Napster to Amazon to Uber to Airbnb and so on. And scores of notable tech leaders have for years cited Christensen's 1997 book The Innovator's Dilemma as a major influence. It's the only business book on the late Steve Jobs' must-read list; Netflix CEO Reed Hastings read it with his executive team when he was developing the idea for his company; and the late Andy Grove, CEO of Intel, said the book and Christensen's theory were responsible for that company's turnaround. [...] He later refined his thinking on disruption, introducing the concept of "jobs to be done," which stressed the need to focus on customers' needs, and acknowledged that disruption was a great way to start a company, but not a good way to grow a company. "It's not a manual for how to grow or how to predict what customers want. [Jobs to be done] is the second side of the same coin: How can I be sure that competitors won't kill me and how can I be sure customers will want to buy the product? So it's actually a very important compliment to disruption."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Gravity: We Might Have Been Getting It Wrong This Whole Time - 25 Jan 2020 at 2:00am - Motoko Kakubayashi, from the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, writes via Phys.org: Physicists have been looking for laws that explain both the microscopic world of elementary particles and the macroscopic world of the universe and the Big Bang at its beginning, expecting that such fundamental laws should have symmetry in all circumstances. However, last year, two physicists found a theoretical proof that, at the most fundamental level, nature does not respect symmetry. There are four fundamental forces in the physical world: electromagnetism, strong force, weak force, and gravity. Gravity is the only force still unexplainable at the quantum level. Its effects on big objects, such as planets or stars, are relatively easy to see, but things get complicated when one tries to understand gravity in the small world of elementary particles. To try to understand gravity on the quantum level, Hirosi Ooguri, the director of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe in Tokyo, and Daniel Harlow, an assistant professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, started with the holographic principle. This principle explains three-dimensional phenomena influenced by gravity on a two-dimensional flat space that is not influenced by gravity. This is not a real representation of our universe, but it is close enough to help researchers study its basic aspects. The pair then showed how quantum error correcting codes, which explain how three-dimensional gravitational phenomena pop out from two dimensions, like holograms, are not compatible with any symmetry; meaning such symmetry cannot be possible in quantum gravity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



36 Years Ago Today, Steve Jobs Unveiled the First Macintosh - 24 Jan 2020 at 10:30pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from MacRumors: On January 24, 1984, former Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced the first Macintosh at Apple's annual shareholder's meeting in Cupertino, California, debuting the new computer equipped with a 9-inch black and white display, an 8MHz Motorola 68000 processor, 128KB of RAM, a 3.5-inch floppy drive, and a price tag of $2,495. The now iconic machine weighed in at a whopping 17 pounds and was advertised as offering a word processing program, a graphics package, and a mouse. At the time it was introduced, the Macintosh was seen as Apple's last chance to overcome IBM's domination of the personal computer market and remain a major player in the personal computer industry. Despite the high price at the time, which was equivalent to around $6,000 today, the Macintosh sold well, with Apple hitting 70,000 units sold by May 1984. The now iconic "1984" Super Bowl ad that Apple invested in and debuted days before the Macintosh was unveiled may have helped bolster sales.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



GE Fridges Won't Dispense Ice Or Water Unless Your Water Filter 'Authenticate... - 24 Jan 2020 at 8:25pm - JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Count GE in on the "screw your customers" bandwagon. Twitter user @ShaneMorris tweeted: "My fridge has an RFID chip in the water filter, which means the generic water filter I ordered for $19 doesn't work. My fridge will literally not dispense ice, or water. I have to pay General Electric $55 for a water filter from them." Fortunately, there appears to be a way to hack them to work: How to Hack RWPFE Water Filters for Your GE Fridge. Hacks aside, count me out from ever buying another GE product if it includes anti-customer "features" like these. "The difference between RWPF and RPWFE is that the RPWFE has a freaking RFID chip on it," writes Jack Busch from groovyPost. "The fridge reads the RFID chip off your filter, and if your filter is either older than 6 months or not a genuine GE RPWFE filter, it's all 'I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't dispense any water for you right now.' Now, to be fair, GE does give you a bypass cartridge that lets you get unfiltered water for free (you didn't throw that thing away, did you?). But come on..." Jack proceeds to explain how you can pop off the filter bypass and "try taping the thing directly into your fridge where it would normally meet up when the filter is install." If you're able to get it in just the right spot, "you're set for life," says Jack. Alternatively, "you can tape it onto the front of an expired RPWFE GE water filter, install it backward, and then keep using it (again, not recommended for too much longer than six months). Or, you can tape it to the corresponding spot on a generic filter and reinstall it."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Free Software Foundation Suggests Microsoft 'Upcycles' Windows 7 As Open Source - 24 Jan 2020 at 8:02pm - The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is urging Microsoft to open source Windows 7, which is no longer supported by the company. The Register reports: On the face of it, the logic seems pretty simple. On January 14, Windows 7 reached its end of life as Microsoft turned off the free security update taps with a final fix. "Its life doesn't have to end," cried the foundation. "We call on Microsoft to upcycle it instead." Unfortunately, the FSF couldn't resist a final dig, saying the killing of the OS had brought to an end "its updates as well as its 10 years of poisoning education, invading privacy, and threatening user security." There is a precedent. Ancient MS-DOS and Word code has been opened up, and the Calculator app found in the current Windows 10 now lurks on GitHub. But an entire, relatively recent OS? We can see some problems, not least the licensed components lurking in Windows 7 that would need to be either excised or open-sourced as well. Then there are the bits and pieces that the company would consider valuable secrets (large chunks of Windows 7 linger on in Windows 10 after all.) And then there is the fact that Windows 7 is not actually unsupported. Three more years of updates are available for those who can pay. And with Windows (as well those parts of it licensed to third parties) still accounting for a sizeable chunk of Microsoft's revenues, we can imagine a very functional and highly compatible free version is not really in the company's best fiscal interests. You can read the FSF's "Upcycle Windows 7" petition here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Support Grows For Unionizing Video Game Industry, Survey Finds - 24 Jan 2020 at 7:45pm - An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hollywood Reporter: Ahead of the Game Developer's Conference (GDC) -- which is dedicated to the art and science of making video games and set to take place March 16-20 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco -- the results of the organization's eighth annual State of Industry report were released Friday. Surveying nearly 4,000 video game developers with the intent of highlighting industry trends and forecasts for the future of gaming, this year's report indicates an increasing interest in the games industry to unionize. This was also a major topic of conversation in 2019, amid reports of gaming professionals working extended overtime hours and tolerating poor working conditions. Among the survey participants, 54 percent said that game industry workers should unionize (a 7 percent increase from last year), 21 percent answered "maybe" and 9 percent said they weren't sure. When the same group was asked whether they thought game industry workers would unionize, only 23 percent said "yes," while 43 percent said "maybe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Apple TV Plus Reportedly Has More Subscribers Than Disney Plus - 24 Jan 2020 at 7:22pm - If a report from The Wall Street Journal is correct, Apple's TV Plus service that launched late last year has 10 million more subscribers than Disney Plus, which launched at a similar time but with access to almost every TV show and movie Disney owns the rights to. For comparison, Apple TV Plus launched with only 11 titles. Fast Company reports: According to the Wall Street Journal, an Ampere Analysis study found that Apple's fledgling Apple TV Plus service garnered an astounding 33.6 million subscribers in the U.S. in Q4 2019. That puts it as the third-most-popular streaming service in America. Here are the top five streaming video services according to the report: 1.) Netflix -- 61.3 million U.S. subscribers; 2.) Amazon Prime Video -- 42.2 million U.S. subscribers; 3.) Apple TV Plus -- 33.6 million U.S. subscribers; 4.) Hulu -- 31.8 million U.S. subscribers; 5.) Disney Plus -- 23.2 million U.S. subscribers. To be sure, Apple TV Plus is the video streaming service with the lowest monthly cost at just $4.99, but with only 11 series or movies available at launch in Q4 2019, how on earth did it leapfrog Disney Plus with its catalog of Marvel, Star Wars, and Pixar offerings (not to mention Baby Yoda)? The answer probably lies in the fact that Apple began giving away free subscriptions to its Apple TV Plus service to anyone who bought an iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Apple TV from mid-September onwards. Given that Apple sells tens of millions of those devices a month, it's no wonder Apple TV Plus has accumulated so many subscribers already. However, the real test for Apple will be how many of those subscribers stay on once their year-long free subscription of Apple TV Plus comes to an end.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



YouTube Moderators Are Being Forced To Sign PTSD Forms - 24 Jan 2020 at 7:02pm - According to The Verge, content moderators for YouTube are being ordered to sign a document acknowledging that performing the job can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). From the report: "I understand the content I will be reviewing may be disturbing," reads the document, which is titled "Acknowledgement" and was distributed to employees using DocuSign. "It is possible that reviewing such content may impact my mental health, and it could even lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). I will take full advantage of the weCare program and seek additional mental health services if needed. I will tell my supervisor/or my HR People Adviser if I believe that the work is negatively affecting my mental health." The PTSD statement comes at the end of the two-page acknowledgment form, and it is surrounded by a thick black border to signify its importance. It may be the most explicit acknowledgment yet from a content moderation company that the job now being done by tens of thousands of people around the world can come with severe mental health consequences. "The wellbeing of our people is a top priority," an Accenture spokeswoman said in an email. "We regularly update the information we give our people to ensure that they have a clear understanding of the work they do -- and of the industry-leading wellness program and comprehensive support services we provide."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Back to school: The mobile gear you'll need on campus - 8 Aug 2019 at 3:56pm - Please enjoy this guide to the best smartphones, tablets and smartwatches for students, just one part of our larger 2019 back-to-school series. In addition to top picks in 11 categories -- everything from laptops to smartphones to gaming and dorm gea...

Appeals court allows Facebook facial recognition lawsuit to proceed - 8 Aug 2019 at 3:26pm - Facebook users now have the green light to sue the company over its use of facial recognition tech. The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled in the plaintiffs' favor 3-0 after Facebook tried to block a class-action lawsuit which cla...

DeepMind uses AI to track Serengeti wildlife with photos - 8 Aug 2019 at 3:09pm - DeepMind has joined the ranks of those using AI to save fragile wildlife populations, and it's doing that on a grand scale. The company is partnering with conservationists and ecologists on a project that uses machine learning to speedily detect and...

Samsung's Galaxy Home smart speaker is still alive, somehow - 8 Aug 2019 at 2:43pm - While Samsung's Unpacked event was mostly about the Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10+, a new S Pen and a Galaxy Book S laptop, plenty of observers expected some news on the fate of Galaxy Home. Samsung announced the smart speaker a year ago, but it's been...

Twitch unveils its own desktop broadcasting app - 8 Aug 2019 at 2:12pm - Until now, people who stream their gameplay or lives on Twitch have done so through a PS4, Xbox One, Twitch's mobile app, Twitch Sings or third-party software. As of today, there's another option for those hoping to become the next Ninja, Dr. Disresp...

Hand-drawn RPG 'Indivisible' finally arrives October 8th - 8 Aug 2019 at 1:56pm - Cuphead isn't the only hand-drawn game to have a years-long birthing process. Lab Zero and 505 Games have announced that their action RPG Indivisible will reach PCs (via Steam), the PS4 and Xbox One on October 8th. The Switch version is "coming soon,...

Apple faces anti-trust probe in Russia over rejected parental control app - 8 Aug 2019 at 1:08pm - Apple's removal of a parental control app has now made it the target of an anti-trust probe in Russia. The nation's Federal Anti-Monopoly Service (FAS) is investigating a complaint by Kaspersky Lab over the rejection of its Safe Kids app from the App...

Sonos will show off new products at IFA this fall - 8 Aug 2019 at 12:39pm - Between releasing speakers in collaboration with IKEA, adding long-awaited Google Assistant support, updating its most popular speaker and launching a partnership with architectural speaker-maker Sonance, Sonos has had a busy 2019. However, it looks...

Popular indie game 'Dear Esther' is coming to iOS - 8 Aug 2019 at 12:27pm - Journey made a surprise debut on iOS this week and you'll soon be able to play another indie darling on the go. The Chinese Room says its exploration-focused Dear Esther will be available for iPhone and iPad later this year.

Why does the Galaxy Note still exist? - 8 Aug 2019 at 12:00pm - Watching the Galaxy Note 10 keynote, it became clear that the whole Note series has run out of runway. When it first launched, it was a wacky experiment to see if there was a market for an over-sized phone. But times have changed, and what was once t...

Google Flights will refund the difference if prices drop unexpectedly - 8 Aug 2019 at 11:54am - Just after shutting down its Trips travel-planning app, Google has announced a raft of travel-related features for other products, including a flight price guarantee. For a limited time, when it tells you prices won't drop on a trip you book through...

iHeartMedia is returning podcasts to their radio roots - 8 Aug 2019 at 11:42am - If you own a radio network, how do you promote your podcasts? By calling back to the roots of podcass and airing them on the radio, of course. iHeartMedia has unveiled a Sunday Night Podcasts initiative that will air podcasts on 270 of its radio st...

The best desktops for back-to-school season - 8 Aug 2019 at 11:31am - Please enjoy this guide to the best desktops for students, just one part of our larger 2019 back-to-school series. In addition to top picks in 11 categories -- everything from laptops to smartphones to gaming and dorm gear -- we went big on tips and...

How would you rate Apple's newest AirPods? - 8 Aug 2019 at 11:30am - The original Airpods from 2016 had issues with sound quality and fit, but the second generation packed in a few upgrades, including a H1 chipset that bolstered Bluetooth connection speeds and a wireless charging case. In his review Senior Editor Chri...

Human Things' Switch charger is also a portable TV dock - 8 Aug 2019 at 11:00am - If you're looking for a portable way to play Nintendo Switch games on a big screen, a new Kickstarter project from accessory maker Human Things, creators of a Switch Bluetooth audio dongle, might be just what you need.

Peer-to-peer 8Chan mirror makes users responsible for its child porn - 8 Aug 2019 at 10:14am - It's been a few days since Cloudflare stopped providing security protections to 8Chan, which led to the notorious site going offline. While 8Chan's leaders are still trying unsuccessfully to bring the site back, some of its users have found a way to...

Facebook tests paid video subscriptions, starting with CollegeHumor - 8 Aug 2019 at 10:00am - Facebook is testing a new video subscription service in Watch. You'd be forgiven for confusing this news with the announcement of "fan subscriptions," which Facebook made last month, but no, video subscriptions is an entirely separate thing.

From indie development to Guerrilla Games: The 'Gravity Ghost' story - 8 Aug 2019 at 9:15am - Erin Robinson Swink knows when someone has actually finished her game, the hand-painted physics-based adventure called Gravity Ghost. "I can usually tell if they played it until the end based on the way they say that to me," she said. "Like, 'Yeah I...

Project Athena gets its own version of the 'Intel Inside' badge - 8 Aug 2019 at 9:00am - Intel teased Project Athena at CES at the start of this year, then in May the company revealed what the program really hopes to achieve: super long battery life, fast charging and 5G all packaged neatly into ultra slim, lightweight devices aimed at t...

Google puts playable podcast episodes in Search - 8 Aug 2019 at 9:00am - Google continues its push into the world of podcasts, not only through its own podcast app but also by adding a new podcast feature to search.

Postmates will test delivery robots on San Francisco sidewalks - 8 Aug 2019 at 8:31am - San Franciscans might soon see Postmates' cute delivery robot rolling down their sidewalks. According to TechCrunch, the food and groceries delivery service has secured what could be the first permit allowing sidewalk robotics operations in the city....

VAIO's port-loaded 12-inch laptop goes on sale in the US - 8 Aug 2019 at 8:01am - Following its launch in Japan, VAIO's small but mighty SX12 -- which offers just about every conceivable I/O you could ever want -- is now available in the US. Its starting price of $1,119 means this isn't a cheap deal, but how could it be when such...

The Morning After: Everything you need to know about the Galaxy Note 10 - 8 Aug 2019 at 7:21am - Welcome to Thursday! If you missed it, Samsung unveiled two new Galaxy Note phones, one a little bigger than the other. There's also a plant-based meatball sub coming to Subway and more details on Nintendo's Switch sequel plans. Oh and (hushed voice)...

Samsung's smaller Galaxy Note 10 5G model won't come to the US - 8 Aug 2019 at 6:35am - Samsung is making 5G versions of both the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Plus, but only the latter version is coming to the US, according to a graphic spotted by The Verge. Meanwhile, a smaller 6.3-inch Galaxy Note 10 5G will definitely be built,...

Google Maps' AR walking directions comes to many more phones - 8 Aug 2019 at 6:00am - One of Google's coolest apps, by far, has yet to see the light of day for most users. I'm talking about Maps' live AR walking directions -- now known as Live View -- that shows you via a Pokémon-like visual overlay how to get to your destinati...

Instagram Won't Stop Showing Me the Mother's Day Photos I Don't Want to See - 19 May 2017 at 3:45pm -

After four and a half years of not speaking to my mom I?ve learned to stay away from social media on Mother?s Day.

Read more...



'World?s Hottest Pepper' Will Have You Breathing Fire, But It Won?t Kill You - 19 May 2017 at 3:40pm -

Not all hot peppers are created equal, and few are as unequal as the Dragon?s Breath chili?a new breed that may soon find itself atop the ?world?s hottest? throne. Forged by Wales horticulturalist Mike Smith, the red-orange, fingernail-sized fruit is the unintentional product of a trial of a new performance-boosting?

Read more...



Federal Agents Are Now Using ?Stingrays? to Track and Capture Undocumented Im... - 19 May 2017 at 3:11pm -

Controversial cellphone tracking technology is being deployed as a tool in President Donald Trump?s expanding effort to arrest and deport illegal US residents.

Read more...



A 'Superbug' Fungus Is Spreading Across the US - 19 May 2017 at 2:13pm -

Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from 7 to more than 122. What?s more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday.

Read more...



All the Dangerous Things You Shouldn't Be Doing With Your Fidget Spinners - 19 May 2017 at 2:09pm -

Like lawn darts, nano-magnets, and slap bracelets, fidget spinners are only one stupid stunt away from becoming yet another forgotten fad. And as usual, instead of enjoying them responsibly, the internet is hard at work trying to find ways to make spinners as dangerous as playing with firecrackers. This is why we?

Read more...



The Venom Movie Has Chosen Its Star/Symbiote Host: Tom Hardy - 19 May 2017 at 2:05pm -

Variety is reporting that Tom Hardy, who played Bane in Christopher Nolan?s The Dark Knight Rises, will next play another iconic comic book villain, Venom. The frequent Spider-Man villain is getting his own film next year, which will be directed by Ruben Fleischer, who made Zombieland.

Read more...



This Cyclops Goat Is Good - 19 May 2017 at 1:45pm -

Eight days ago, a one-eyed goat was born in the Indian state of Assam. Since then, this brave little fluff has become an international sensation for obvious reasons: clearly, it?s training to be in the X-Men.

Read more...



Inside The Russian Bomber That?s Been Flying America?s Coastline - 19 May 2017 at 1:22pm -

The Russian Tu-95/-142 Bear has been showing up in a lot of places it maybe shouldn?t be over the past month, as the Russian Air Force and Navy continues to probe the air defenses of several nations.The sixty-year-old symbol of the Cold War has been able to remain a viable weapon system despite its age, much the way?

Read more...



This Is How Miserable IBM Voice Recognition Probably Was in the '80s - 19 May 2017 at 1:13pm -

In the age of Siri, we take for granted how far speech recognition technology has come. But a quick glance back at 1986, when IBM introduced its voice recognition software, shows that we?ve travelled light years since the earliest version of this game-changing software. And it?s even more fun in satire form.

Read more...



Automate An Outlet With TP-Link's Alexa-Compatible Smart Plug, Now Just $21 - 19 May 2017 at 12:50pm -

Like the idea of a Belkin WeMo Switch, but not willing to spend $40-$50 to try one out? This TP-Link alternative has a nearly identical feature set for half the price.

Read more...



Flat Earthers Won't Believe This News on Antarctica?s Climate - 19 May 2017 at 12:39pm -

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we?re overlooking a basic reality of geometry.

Read more...



I'm Afraid to Ask The Internet to Name This New Moon - 19 May 2017 at 12:10pm -

Good news! Three space telescopes, including Hubble, have combined their celestial powers to spot a moon orbiting a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt ?the region beyond Neptune where Pluto and countless other icy bodies live. According to NASA, the dwarf planet?s moon has lots to teach scientists about how moons formed?

Read more...



Rudy Giuliani Forgot 9/11('s Effect on Commercial Air Travel) - 19 May 2017 at 11:30am -

Yesterday morning, Rudy Giuliani?America?s mayor, Donald Trump?s current cybersecurity advisor, and a race-baiting thug most famous for being circumstantially tied to a great tragedy?had a little dust-up with the TSA while making his way through Newark airport. Apparently, the former mayor who famously saw his city?

Read more...



Google's Coolest Tech Is Getting Harder and Harder to See - 19 May 2017 at 11:25am -

Google always uses its annual I/O developer conference as a place to trot out some of its biggest and most exciting product updates. You?d be forgiven for feeling like this year was kind of a dud. There were no new gadgets, no new moonshot projects, and not even cool new swag like Google Cardboard headsets. The?

Read more...



The First AI-Generated Paint Names Include 'Homestar Brown' and 'Stanky Bean' - 19 May 2017 at 11:20am -

Humans aren?t nearly as creative as we think. Craft brewers, for example, have run out of fun names and are sending each other cease and desist letters for coming up with the same ideas. So, what if we let computers come up with new names for us?

Read more...



Duck Me, Ducktales Has Added Lin-Manuel Miranda as Gizmoduck - 19 May 2017 at 11:14am -

Man, the cast for the new DuckTales cartoon was already pretty insane. And now it just got even better.

Read more...



'Panda' Porpoise Could Be Extinct In Months - 19 May 2017 at 11:10am -

Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one. These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world? the Northern Gulf of California. Their nickname?the ?panda? porpoise?comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of?

Read more...



Sad, Sick Idiot Anthony Weiner to Plead Guilty to Sexting 15-Year-Old Girl - 19 May 2017 at 11:03am -

Early Friday morning, former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner surrendered himself to FBI agents and will appear before a federal judge later this afternoon. There, he will plead guilty to transferring obscene material to a minor, multiple news outlets report.

Read more...



Uber Threatens to Dump Engineer Accused of Stealing Trade Secrets From Waymo - 19 May 2017 at 10:50am -

Lots of people get fired from Uber. One employee was reportedly fired last year for helping his female coworkers raise complaints about sexual harassment. Drivers get deactivated from the platform if their ratings slip below a certain number (Uber says the minimum rating varies by city, but driver forums say dipping?

Read more...



Today's Best Deals: Under Armour Apparel, Kamado Grill, SoundBuds, and More - 19 May 2017 at 10:28am -

Anker?s newest SoundBuds, a Big Green Egg alternative, and a huge Under Armour apparel sale lead off Friday?s best deals from around the web.

Read more...